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Thursday, April 14
 

2:00pm

Exclusive KEXP Tour

KEXP invites Pop Conference participants to a "sneak peek" tour of KEXP's new home at Seattle Center.

Featuring the Microsoft/Listen "Inside the Music of KEXP" installation, plus a short performance by a very special TBA guest in the public gathering space of the new home.

Must show Pop Conference credentials for entry.



Thursday April 14, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
KEXP 90.3FM 472 1st Avenue N Seattle, WA 98109

3:30pm

The Racial Publics of Siouxsie Sioux
Joshua Chambers-Letson, “Punk, Blackness, and the Communism of Siouxsie’s Voice”
Summer Kim Lee, “Voices on the Other Side: Siouxsie Sioux’s White Femininity and Capacious Vocality”
Iván A. Ramos, “Nicotine Stains: On Siouxsie Sioux’s Racial Publics”
Richard T. Rodríguez, “‘Red Over White’: Siouxsie’s Disidentifications”

Moderators
avatar for Gustavus Stadler

Gustavus Stadler

Gustavus Stadler teaches English and American studies at Haverford College. He writes about race, sexuality, popular music, sound, audio technology, and literature in the 19th and 20th centuries. From 2010 to 2013, he co-edited The Journal of Popular Music Studies with Karen Tongson. He is currently writing a book titled Woody Guthrie and the Intimate Life of the Left. “Queer People’s Songs” | On December 31, 1945, Pete Seeger... Read More →

Speakers
JC

Joshua Chambers-Letson

Joshua Chambers-Letson is Assistant Professor of Performance Studies at Northwestern University. He is the author of A Race So Different: Law and Performance in Asian America (NYU Press, 2013), winner of the 2014 Outstanding Book Award from the Association of Theater in Higher Education. He has published in journals including the Journal of Popular Music Studies, Social Text, Criticism, and MELUS. With Ann Pellegrini and Tavia Nyong’o, he... Read More →
SK

Summer Kim Lee

Summer Kim Lee is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Performance Studies at New York University. Her dissertation, “Peripheral Presence: Race, Gender, Media, and the Performance of Detachment,” examines how performances of detachment enact a women of color feminist critique of transnational representations of race and gender in contemporary media. She has served as Managing Editor of Women & Performance and has published in... Read More →
IA

Iván A. Ramos

Iván A. Ramos is a UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Ethnic Studies at UC Riverside. He received his PhD in Performance Studies from UC Berkeley. His project examines how Mexican and U.S. Latina/o artists and publics utilized sound to articulate negation in the wake of NAFTA. His writing appears or is forthcoming in ARARA: Art and Architecture of the Americas, Women & Performance, Studies in Gender and... Read More →
avatar for Richard T. Rodríguez

Richard T. Rodríguez

Richard T. Rodríguez is Associate Professor of English and Latina/Latino Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where he is also affiliated with the Department of Gender and Women's Studies and the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory. The author of Next of Kin: The Family in Chicano/a Cultural Politics and many articles and reviews, he is currently writing a book on Latino male sexualities in film and... Read More →


Thursday April 14, 2016 3:30pm - 5:30pm
Learning Labs

3:30pm

Throwing Voices

Hilarie Ashton, “Are You There, (Oh) G-d: Rapture in Pop Music Sound/Voices”
Ashon Crawley, “Resonance”
Joon Oluchi Lee, “Mary Gaitskill, a Melon Baller, and a George Michael Song”
Eric Lott, “Backup as Foreground”


Moderators
avatar for Jeremy Braddock

Jeremy Braddock

Jeremy Braddock is co-editor of two books, Paris, Capital of the Black Atlantic and Directed by Allen Smithee, and is the author of Collecting as Modernist Practice, which won the Modernist Studies Association book prize in 2013. He ran the Tweed Penguin cassette label from 1987 to 1993, and published the zine Verbivore between 1994 and 1996. He is Associate Professor of English at Cornell. “Throwing Voices” | Throwing the voice is a... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Hilarie Ashton

Hilarie Ashton

Hilarie Ashton is a doctoral student in English at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she focuses on embodiment in American studies, composition and rhetoric, cultural criticism, and pedagogy. She teaches composition and literature at Queens College. Her essays have appeared in Anamesa and Journal of Popular Culture, among others, and she has presented her work at a range of conferences, including the American Comparative Literature Association, the... Read More →
AC

Ashon Crawley

Ashon Crawley is Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies at UC Riverside. His research and teaching experiences are in the areas of Black Studies, Performance Theory and Sound Studies, Philosophy and Theology, and Black Feminist and Queer theories. His first book project, Blackpentecostal Breath: The Aesthetics of Possibility, which investigates aesthetics and performance as modes of collective, social imaginings otherwise, will be published... Read More →
avatar for Joon Oluchi Lee

Joon Oluchi Lee

Joon Oluchi Lee is Associate Professor of Literary Arts and Studies at Rhode Island School of Design. He is the author of two books of fiction, 94 (Publication Studio Portland, 2015) and Lace Sick Bag (Publication Studio Portland, 2013). His essays, including “The Joy of the Castrated Boy” (Social Text, F/W 2005), have appeared in various academic and alternative publications. His writing and textual... Read More →
avatar for Eric Lott

Eric Lott

Eric Lott teaches American Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center. He has written and lectured widely on the politics of U.S. cultural history, and his work has appeared in a range of periodicals, from The Nation to American Quarterly. He is the author of Love and Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class (Oxford UP, 1993/2013), The Disappearing Liberal Intellectual (Basic Books, 2006), and the forthcoming Black Mirror: The Cultural... Read More →


Thursday April 14, 2016 3:30pm - 5:30pm
Demo Lab EMP Museum, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

3:30pm

Roundtable: Voicing Girlhood in Popular Music
The young female voice is routinely denied authority: clichés of girls as frivolous, silly, and deserving of contempt prevail in mainstream popular imagery. Yet popular music is widely understood as an important vehicle for allowing girls and women to “speak out” or “make their voices heard.” This roundtable will explore the relationship between girlhood and voice in popular music. Drawing on their contributions to a new anthology of essays, Voicing Girlhood in Popular Music: Music, Performance, and Activism, the participants will address contexts as diverse as golden-age Hollywood musicals, early 21st century tween pop, and contemporary hip-hop twerking videos.

Moderators
avatar for Sarah Dougher

Sarah Dougher

Sarah Dougher is a writer, educator, and musician from Portland, Oregon. She is currently collaborating with Diane Pecknold on a book about American tween music criticism. She teaches American music cultures and gender studies at Portland State University and at high schools around the Portland area. Last year she had a Fulbright in Norway, and began work on her first volume of poetry.  “Roundtable: Voicing Girlhood in Popular... Read More →

Speakers
DA

Daphne A. Brooks

Daphne A. Brooks is the author of two books: Bodies in Dissent: Spectacular Performances of Race and Freedom, 1850-1910 (Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2006) and Jeff Buckley’s Grace (New York: Continuum, 2005). She is currently working on a new book entitled Subterranean Blues: Black Women Sound Modernity (Harvard University Press, forthcoming). Brooks has authored numerous articles on race, gender, performance, and... Read More →
avatar for Nina Sun Eidsheim

Nina Sun Eidsheim

Nina Sun Eidsheim (UCLA Department of Musicology) and has published Sensing Sound: Singing and Listening as Vibrational Practice (Duke UP, 2015) and Measuring Race: the Micropolitics of Listening to Vocal Timbre and Vocality in African-American Popular Music (Duke UP, forthcoming). She has co-edited the Oxford Handbook of Voice Studies and special issue for Postmodern Culture. Eidsheim has received fellowships including from the Mellon... Read More →
avatar for Lucy O’Brien

Lucy O’Brien

Lucy O’Brien has published She Bop: The Definitive History of Women in Popular Music (revised and updated for its third edition, 2013), plus in-depth biographies including Madonna: Like An Icon (2007) and Dusty (2000). She played in all-girl punk band The Catholic Girls; wrote for NME; and has contributed to publications including the Guardian, Sunday Times, Q, and MOJO. She is currently Course Leader for the BA Music Journalism at... Read More →
avatar for Gayle Wald

Gayle Wald

Gayle Wald teaches at George Washington University. Her most recent book is It's Been Beautiful: Soul! And Black Power TV. With Oliver Wang, she co-edits The Journal of Popular Music Studies.  “Roundtable: Voicing Girlhood in Popular Music” | Popular music discourse surrounding the voices of girls and girlishness is profoundly contradictory. While girls’ voices are more prominent than ever in popular music culture, the... Read More →


Thursday April 14, 2016 3:30pm - 5:30pm
JBL Theater

5:30pm

Opening Reception
Thursday April 14, 2016 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Sky Church

7:00pm

Keynote: TO SING: The Care and Keeping of the Voice in Music

What would a conference whose theme is the voice be without singers? This keynote conversation welcomes three remarkable vocalists in discussion about how they’ve discovered, nurtured, and continue to develop both their instruments and their musical vision. What makes a pop voice distinctive? How do the challenges of a life in popular music, including the difficulties of touring and the challenges of recording, both help shape and sometimes endanger a voice? What is the relationship between songwriting, song interpretation, and “pure” singing? How do singers preserve the pleasure of vocalizing over the course of their lifetimes? What remains personal about the art of singing, and how does that intermingle with technique? How has technology aided the singer’s craft while also sometimes standing in the way of “real” voices being recognized? These questions and others will be entertained in a casual, fun conversation about what makes a voice, a voice.


Moderators
avatar for Ann Powers

Ann Powers

Ann Powers is critic and correspondent for NPR Music. She is the author of several books, including the forthcoming history of American music's relationship with American love and sex. “Hard Rock, Sex Sounds, and the Groupie System: Life at the Riot House, 1973” | The Los Angeles-grounded hard rock scene of the early-to-mid 1970s is often remembered as a lawless milieu: a Wild West populated by satin-clad outlaws and erotic... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Merrill Garbus

Merrill Garbus

Merrill Garbus found her voice through studying theater and puppetry, and by traveling the world. As the founder of the unclassifiable tUnE-yArDs, the Bay Area ensemble she’s led since 2006, has she has developed a distinctive blend of the raw and the cooked in music that’s technologically savvy, relentlessly self-exploratory, and spiritually unbound. tUnE-yArDs has released three albums, most recently 2014’s Nikki-Nack... Read More →
avatar for Valerie June

Valerie June

Valerie June spent many years developing her voice before emerging as a major young star of Americana music in the early 2010s. Raised in West Tennessee, June absorbed all varieties of Southern music as well as soul, pop, and reggae, and further fed her muse by travelling the country before settling in Memphis. She became a central player in that city’s underground scene and was featured in projects like Luther Dickinson’s band The... Read More →
avatar for k.d. lang

k.d. lang

Four-time GRAMMY® winner k.d. lang is one of the most beloved songwriters and song interpreters in popular music. Bucking simple definitions of country music in early albums that were true to tradition while playfully making the genre modern, lang, who grew up in Western Canada, made one of the finest albums of the 1980s in Shadowland, her countrypolitan collaboration with the late, great producer Owen Bradley. She became a bona-fide pop star... Read More →


Thursday April 14, 2016 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Sky Church

9:00pm

Record Store Showdown

In honor of Record Store Day and as part of EMP’s Pop Con, watch as teams representing a few of Seattle’s independent record stores battle it out and put their encyclopedic knowledge of music to the test! Hosted by Greg Vandy of KEXP’s The Roadhouse. Featuring teams from Everyday Music, Sonic Boom, Spin Cycle, and Easy Street.


Speakers
avatar for Greg Vandy

Greg Vandy

Greg Vandy is host of The Roadhouse, a weekly radio show on KEXP-Seattle and the publisher of American Standard Time, a blog dedicated to American music and vintage lifestyle. He also curates for the Pickathon music festival and his first book 26 Songs In 30 Days: Woody Guthrie’s Columbia River Songs & The Planned Promised Land In The Pacific Northwest is slated for release April 12, 2016 via Sasquatch Books. Over... Read More →


Thursday April 14, 2016 9:00pm - 11:00pm
The Lounge 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109
 
Friday, April 15
 

9:00am

Soul Singers

Michaelangelo Matos, “Prisoner of Your Love: How Tina Turner Came Back”
Charles Mudede, “Fontella Bass and the Philosophy of Sound”
Matthew Valnes, “‘Just a Little Bit of Soul Now’: Voice-Altering Technologies and the Sounds of Funk”


Moderators
DA

Daphne A. Brooks

Daphne A. Brooks is the author of two books: Bodies in Dissent: Spectacular Performances of Race and Freedom, 1850-1910 (Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2006) and Jeff Buckley’s Grace (New York: Continuum, 2005). She is currently working on a new book entitled Subterranean Blues: Black Women Sound Modernity (Harvard University Press, forthcoming). Brooks has authored numerous articles on race, gender, performance, and... Read More →

Speakers
MM

Michaelangelo Matos

Michaelangelo Matos is the author of The Underground Is Massive: How Electronic Dance Music Conquered America. He is at work on a history of the music business in the mid-’80s. He lives in the Twin Cities. “Prisoner of Your Love: How Tina Turner Came Back” | “What can you say about TINA TURNER?” begins Regency Artists’ circa-1982 bio of the R&B star. The Capitol Records biography, dated February 1984, gave... Read More →
avatar for Charles Mudede

Charles Mudede

Charles Mudede is a music, film, and cultural critic for The Stranger.  He has also contributed to a number of national and international publications. “Fontella Bass and the Philosophy of Soul” | In 2002, the British nu-jazz collective the Cinematic Orchestra opened its second album Every Day with a wonderful experiment in soul called “All That You Give.” It featured the mostly forgotten but very talented Fontella... Read More →
MV

Matthew Valnes

Matthew Valnes received a PhD in music from the University of Pennsylvania. His work focuses on improvisation in Afrodiasporic popular music, with a particular emphasis on funk. He has presented his work at national and international conferences. He is currently working on book that examines improvisation and technology in the construction of post-Civil Rights era popular music. “‘Just a Little Bit of Soul Now&rsquo... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
JBL Theater

9:00am

Vocaloids and the Human
Nina Sun Eidsheim, “Vocaloid Refused, Re-Imagined, and Re-Purposed: Analyzing a Vocal Synthesis Phenomena as Style and Technique”
Gretchen Jude, “Songs from the Uncanny Valley: The Posthuman Vocality of the Vocaloids”
Catherine Provenzano, “Feeling the Human and the Politics of Vocal Pitch Correction: Notes from the Field”

Moderators
DP

Diane Pecknold

Diane Pecknold is Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Louisville. She is author of The Selling Sound: The Rise of the Country Music Industry and editor of Hidden in the Mix: The African American Presence in Country Music. She also co-edited, with Kristine M. McCusker, A Boy Named Sue: Gender and Country Music and its forthcoming companion volume, Country Boys and Redneck Women: New Essays on Gender and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Nina Sun Eidsheim

Nina Sun Eidsheim

Nina Sun Eidsheim (UCLA Department of Musicology) and has published Sensing Sound: Singing and Listening as Vibrational Practice (Duke UP, 2015) and Measuring Race: the Micropolitics of Listening to Vocal Timbre and Vocality in African-American Popular Music (Duke UP, forthcoming). She has co-edited the Oxford Handbook of Voice Studies and special issue for Postmodern Culture. Eidsheim has received fellowships including from the Mellon... Read More →
avatar for Gretchen Jude

Gretchen Jude

Gretchen Jude is a vocalist and electronic musician who performs traditional, experimental, and improvised music around the world. She holds an MFA in Electronic Music and Recording Media from Mills College and koto certification from the Sawai Koto Institute in Tokyo. Gretchen is also a linguist, a composer, and a PhD candidate in Performance Studies at UC Davis, where her research interests include presence and embodiment in computer music, and... Read More →
avatar for Catherine Provenzano

Catherine Provenzano

Catherine Provenzano is a PhD candidate in ethnomusicology at New York University. Her research is on vocal production in contemporary North American pop and pop country, and she conducts ethnographic work in New York, Los Angeles, and Nashville recording studios. She focuses particularly on tuning plug-ins, the ways they inform performance, production, and listening practices, and the ways the voice is parametrized in software. She is also a... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Demo Lab EMP Museum, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

9:00am

Voice and Indigeneity
Anthony Easton, “Caught in the Throat: Some Problems of Inuit Musical Culture and the Canadian State”
Clare O’Connor, “‘Not Particularly Human At All’: Listening to Tanya Tagaq”
Daniel Fisher, “The Music of Celebrity: Avatars of the Voice in Northern Australia”

Moderators
avatar for Carl Wilson

Carl Wilson

Carl Wilson is a freelance writer, the music critic for Slate, and the author of Let’s Talk About Love: Why Other People Have Such Bad Taste. In the winter of 2016, he will be the visiting Southam Lecturer in the Creative Writing program at the University of Victoria. He is a frequent presenter and former programming committee member of the Pop Conference. Most of the time he lives and cries in Toronto, Canada. “Just Can’t Keep... Read More →

Speakers
AE

Anthony Easton

Anthony Easton is a critic, originally from Edmonton and now living in Hamilton, Ontario. They have written about music for the Atlantic Online, Buzzfeed, Stylus, Freaky Trigger, Red State Reader, Singles Jukebox, Pitchfork, Spin, and the National Post. They have a ThM from University of Toronto and a MA in Religious Studies from Concordia, in Montreal. “Caught in the Throat: Some Problems of Inuit Musical Culture and the Canadian... Read More →
DF

Daniel Fisher

Daniel Fisher is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at UC Berkeley. He is co-editor of Radio Fields: Anthropology and Wireless Sound in the 21st Century (NYU Press, 2012), and author of The Voice and its Doubles (Duke University, forthcoming April 2016). He has contributed to journals such as American Ethnologist and Cultural Anthropology, and the collections Aural Cultures and Keywords in Sound. His current research explores the political... Read More →
CO

Clare O’Connor

Clare O’Connor is a doctoral student in Communication at the University of Southern California. She studies the latent liberatory content of popular music and its implications for contemporary social movements. Her publications include Keywords for Radicals: The Contested Vocabulary of Late Capitalist Struggle (AK Press, 2016). Between 2008 and 2012 she served on the Editorial Committee of Upping The Anti: A Journal of Theory and... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

9:00am

Roundtable: Voces in the Key of 1968
This roundtable brings together Latina/o American music scholars charged with a collaborative assignment: each panelist will bring in a meditation on voices in songs from 1968 and reflect upon the political, aesthetic, and technological transitions made lively in them. Alejandra Bronfman will turn up the volume on the muted female voices of reggae, primarily Judy Mowatt. Licia Fiol-Matta will discuss Chavela Vargas, who came to embody Mexico’s “queer singer for the nation.” Alexandra T. Vazquez will continue her to feel her way around the loose aesthetic category she calls “Gulf Stream Psychedelia.”

Speakers
avatar for Alejandra Bronfman

Alejandra Bronfman

Alejandra Bronfman (PhD Princeton University, 2000) is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at UBC. She recently completed a book project entitled Isles of Noise: Sonic Media in the Caribbean (in press, Univ. of North Carolina Press), which aims to record the unwritten histories of broadcasting and related technologies in the Caribbean. Future and past research interests include histories of race; the production of knowledge; and... Read More →
avatar for Licia Fiol-Matta

Licia Fiol-Matta

Licia Fiol-Matta is Professor of Latin American Studies at CUNY. She is the author of A Queer Mother for the Nation: The State and Gabriela Mistral (Minnesota) and The Great Woman Singer: Voice, Gender, and Politics in Puerto Rican Music (Duke, forthcoming). Fiol-Matta is co-editor of the series New Directions in Latino American Cultures (Palgrave); “Las Américas Quarterly,” a special issue of American Quarterly (Fall... Read More →
AT

Alexandra T. Vazquez

Alexandra T. Vazquez is Associate Professor in the Department of Performance Studies at New York University. Her book, Listening in Detail: Performances of Cuban Music (Duke University Press 2013), won the American Studies Association’s Lora Romero Book Prize in 2014. Vazquez’s work has been featured in the journals American Quarterly, Social Text, women and performance, and the Journal of Popular Music Studies, and in the edited... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Learning Labs

10:45am

(Un)Feminine Voices
Jenn Pelly, “Girls Invented Punk Not England: Vocalizing Gender in 2016”
Alison Fensterstock, “I’d Much Rather Be with The Girls: Girl-Group Pop and the Voice of the Adolescent Girl”
Nicolette Rohr, “She Loves You YEAH YEAH YEAH: The ’60s Soundscape of Beatlemania”

Moderators
EM

Evelyn McDonnell

Evelyn McDonnell has written or co-edited six books, from Rock She Wrote: Women Write about Rock, Pop and Rap to Queens of Noise: The Real Story of the Runaways. A longtime journalist, she has been a pop culture writer at The Miami Herald and a senior editor at The Village Voice. Her writing on music, poetry, theater, and culture has appeared in publications and anthologies including the Los Angeles Times, Ms., Rolling Stone, The New York... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alison Fensterstock

Alison Fensterstock

Alison Fensterstock is a former music writer for the New Orleans’ Times-Picayune and program director for the Ponderosa Stomp Foundation. In 2011, she co-curated the companion symposium to Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ “She’s Got the Power” girl-group showcase, which featured interviews with the Exciters, the Angels, and Lesley Gore. “I’d Much Rather Be with The Girls: Girl-Group Pop and the... Read More →
JP

Jenn Pelly

Jenn Pelly is an associate editor at Pitchfork. Her writing has appeared in Spin, The Village Voice, Nylon, and Billboard and online at The New York Times and Rolling Stone. She is at work on her first book, a volume in the 33 1/3 series on The Raincoats' 1979 debut, to be published in the fall of 2016. A college radio enthusiast, she most recently hosted Crucial Chaos, the long-running hardcore show on WNYU 89.1 FM.  “Girls... Read More →
avatar for Nicolette Rohr

Nicolette Rohr

Nicolette Rohr is a PhD candidate in History at UC Riverside. Her dissertation project explores popular music fandom among American women during the 1960s. She holds an MA in Public History and co-curated an exhibition of photographer Garry Winogrand’s Women are Beautiful at the California Museum of Photography in 2013. In 2015, she was a Gladys Kriebel Delmas Visiting Scholar at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Library and Archives in... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 10:45am - 12:45pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

10:45am

Passionate Prayers
Terri Brinegar, “Whoopin’, Singin’, and Shoutin’: The Crossroads of the African American Sermonette with Class and Racial Ideologies in the 1920s”
Joshua Kalin Busman, “Corporate Worship, Group Singing, and Mass Mediation at the Passion Conference “
Christina Zanfagna, “A Lion in Zion: Snoop’s Black Americas”
José G. Anguiano, “Voicing the Occult in Chicana/o Culture and Hybridity: Prayers and the Cholo-Goth Aesthetic”

Moderators
BE

Banning Eyre

Banning Eyre is an author, guitarist, radio producer, journalist, photographer, and producer for the Peabody Award-winning public radio series Afropop Worldwide. His work has taken him to over 15 African countries to research local music, especially guitar styles. He comments on world music for NPR’s All Things Considered. He has published four books, the most recent book being Lion Songs, Thomas Mapfumo and the Music that Made Zimbabwe... Read More →

Speakers
JG

José G. Anguiano

José G. Anguiano is an Assistant Professor in the Honors College and the Department of Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies at California State University, Los Angeles. Dr. Anguiano is a cultural studies scholar with a primary focus in listeners and audiences of popular music. Dr. Anguiano’s research documents how popular music links communities of listeners across time and space, and how listening can be an active and creative form of... Read More →
TB

Terri Brinegar

Terri Brinegar is a PhD student in ethnomusicology at University of Florida. She holds a Master of Arts degree in Classical voice from University of Central Florida, and a Bachelor of Music degree in Classical voice from North Texas State University. Terri’s areas of interest include African American music, specifically related to singing practices, spanning from the Negro Spiritual to contemporary R&B. “Whoopin&rsquo... Read More →
avatar for Joshua Kalin Busman

Joshua Kalin Busman

Joshua Kalin Busman is a Lecturer in Music History at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. He earned his PhD in Musicology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He also holds a BM in Music Theory and Composition from Middle Tennessee State University as well as an MA in Musicology from UNC-CH. His research deals with pop and rock-styled worship music in American evangelicalism using ethnography, phenomenology, and... Read More →
CZ

Christina Zanfagna

Christina Zanfagna is Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Santa Clara University in music and ethnic studies. She received her PhD in ethnomusicology from UCLA. Her research focuses on music’s relationship to religion, race, and geography in urban America, with an emphasis on Black sacred and popular musics. Christina has worked for non-profit organizations such as Afropop Worldwide, Mosaic Multicultural Foundation, and the Prison... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 10:45am - 12:45pm
Demo Lab EMP Museum, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

10:45am

Reflections on the Future Present
Jack Hamilton, “After the Future: Future, the Voice, and the Life of Auto-Tune”
Meaghan Garvey, “Same Damn Time: Future and the Art of the Alter Ego”
Pete L’Official, “Future’s Lower Frequencies”

Speakers
MG

Meaghan Garvey

Meaghan Garvey is a writer and illustrator from Chicago currently living in New York. She has written for Pitchfork, Billboard, The Village Voice, Noisey, and others, along with occasional illustration work, and is currently working on a new and secret project. She has published illustrated Greek mythology-themed Future investigations in The Pitchfork Review quarterly magazine, and digitally self-publishes a collaborative, samurai-themed comic... Read More →
avatar for Jack Hamilton

Jack Hamilton

Jack Hamilton teaches in the departments of American Studies and Media Studies at the University of Virginia. He is also the pop critic for Slate, where he writes about music, sports, and other areas of culture. His first book, Just Around Midnight: Rock and Roll and the Racial Imagination, is forthcoming from Harvard University Press in fall of 2016. “After the Future: Future, the Voice, and the Life of Auto-Tune” | Critical... Read More →
PL

Pete L’Official

Pete L’Official teaches in the literature program in the division of languages and literature at Bard College, and writes about art, sports, music, and culture. “Future’s Lower Frequencies” | “Robotic is the world in which everyone sings perfectly without even knowing it.” Writing about Auto-Tune, these are the words of Dave Tompkins in an appendix to his history of the vocoder, How to Wreck a Nice Beach... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 10:45am - 12:45pm
Learning Labs

10:45am

Roundtable: Noise Breeding Silence—Heavy Metal Voices
Metal remains fixed as a quintessentially white male hetero form in its most visible artists and presumed demographic. The emergent field of “metal studies” has begun to document metal’s appeal to women, non-white, and LGBTQ audiences, and to millions in the developing world. This panel considers to and for whom metal seems most to be speaking. Do metal’s various subgenres (death, black, doom, grindcore, etc.) all draw on the same underlying voice? Are different strains more or less inclusive? How do questions concerning metal’s inclusivity look different from a global vantage? What can we learn from participants who occupy non-dominant positions relative to core constituencies?

Moderators
SW

Steve Waksman

Steve Waksman is Professor of Music and American Studies at Smith College. His publications include the books Instruments of Desire: The Electric Guitar and the Shaping of Musical Experience (Harvard University Press, 1999), and This Ain’t the Summer of Love: Conflict and Crossover in Heavy Metal and Punk (University of California Press, 2009). With Reebee Garofalo, he is the co-author of the rock history textbook, Rockin’ Out... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Esther Clinton

Esther Clinton

Esther Clinton earned her PhD in Folklore from Indiana University and is currently Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Popular Culture at Bowling Green State University. Her research interests include folk and popular narrative, Norse mythology, folklore of belief, proverbs, heavy metal studies, and Southeast Asian history and culture. In 2013 she, Dr. Jeremy Wallach, and Dr. Matthew Donahue co-organized and ran the Heavy Metal... Read More →
LD

Laina Dawes

Laina Dawes is the author of What Are You Doing Here? A Black Woman’s Life and Liberation in Heavy Metal (Bazillion Points, 2012). She is also a music and cultural critic whose writing can be found in print and online magazines, such as Hazlitt, Bitch, SPIN, Cuepoint, Wondering Sound, Flavorwire, Refinery29, MTV Iggy, MySpace, The Wire UK, NPR, Toronto Star and Exclaim! Canada. Laina recently graduated with a MA in Liberal Studies... Read More →
JJ

Joan Jocson-Singh

Joan Jocson-Singh is an Acquisitions Librarian at Columbia University in New York. She received her library science and archival degrees from Pratt Institute and is currently pursuing a second master’s in anthropology at Hunter College. She is also a book reviewer for CHOICE Library Journal and for Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLISNA), where she reviews titles on art, architecture, anthropology, and ethnomusicology. Her... Read More →
avatar for Kat Katz

Kat Katz

Kat Katz is a vocalist, artist, and poet from Northern Virginia. She has been singing in heavy metal bands for over 16 years. Her previous band, Salome, toured across the U.S. and released multiple EPs and albums from 2006-2011. Salome’s 2010 full length, Terminal, received positive reviews from NPR, The New York Times, and the Financial Times. Kat joined Agoraphobic Nosebleed, headed by Scott Hull of Pig Destroyer, in 2007. Their 2009... Read More →
avatar for Jeremy Wallach

Jeremy Wallach

Jeremy Wallach is a professor in the Department of Popular Culture at Bowling Green State University. He is author of Modern Noise, Fluid Genres: Popular Music in Indonesia, 1997-2001 (2008) and co-editor of a special issue of Asian Music on Indonesian popular music genres (with Esther Clinton, 2013). An ethnomusicologist and anthropologist, Jeremy has written extensively on metal music and culture, and is co-editor of Metal Rules the... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 10:45am - 12:45pm
JBL Theater

1:00pm

Interview: Wynne Greenwood, Tracy + The Plastics, Interviewed by Maria Buszek

Seattle-based artist Wynne Greenwood, better-known in music circles as Tracy + The Plastics, has been giving voice to feminist and queer politics by way of her eclectic practice for over a decade.  In her performances as Tracy + The Plastics, “members” of the band—slightly bossy front woman Tracy, contentious keyboardist Nikki, and spaced-out percussionist Cola, who “play all the instruments and sing” on the band’s albums—appear in live performances as Greenwood performing as Tracy onstage, awkwardly, hilariously interacting with Nikki and Cola as pre-recorded video projections. Between 1999 and 2006 Tracy + The Plastics performed in venues ranging from punk clubs to theaters to the Whitney Museum, and the “band” was recently revisited as part of Greenwood’s 2015 residency at New York City’s New Museum of Contemporary Art.

Greenwood has written of the band’s underlying goal: “A Tracy + the Plastics performance attempts to destroy the hierarchical dynamics of mass media’s say/see spaces by placing as much importance on the video images (the plastics) as the live performer (Tracy).” And, between the stilted, silence-laden on-stage “banter” of Greenwood in her various permutations and the pointedly open stage set-up, wherein the performance occupies a space that bleeds out into the seating, this hierarchy-destroying approach extends to artist-audience dynamics as the viewers are similarly encouraged to blur the line between who is there to “say” and who is there to “see.” And, in Greenwood’s many projects since—in recordings, videos, installations, collaborations with the LTTR collective and, most recently, her Kelly project at The New Museum—she has explored the role of diverse, overlapping, contradictory voices in the activist communities of which she is a part.

In this interview with art historian Maria Elena Buszek, Greenwood address the multiple “voices” she applies and mines, the relevance of music and club culture, and both the pleasures and problems of hybridity in her work, as well as screen examples of her performances and music videos.


Moderators
avatar for Maria Elena Buszek

Maria Elena Buszek

Maria Elena Buszek is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Colorado, Denver, where she teaches courses on modern and contemporary art. Her recent publications include the books Pin-Up Grrrls: Feminism, Sexuality, Popular Culture and Extra/Ordinary: Craft and Contemporary Art, and contributions to the anthology Punkademics: The Basement Show in the Ivory Tower and exhibition catalog Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia. Her current book... Read More →

Speakers
WG

Wynne Greenwood

Wynne Greenwood is a queer feminist performance artist and educator who works in various media such as installation art, photography, filmmaking and music. Greenwood’s work has been performed and exhibited extensively, including at The New Museum, The Kitchen, NYC, The Tate Modern, and the 2004 Whitney Biennial. Raised in Washington State, she teaches at Seattle University, and in 2008 she was awarded The Stranger’s Genius Award for... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 1:00pm - 1:50pm
JBL Theater

1:00pm

Roundtable: Voices from the Outpost of Hip-Hop

Seattle has launched two rappers into the sphere of pop stardom: Sir-Mix-a-Lot and Macklemore. To the rest of the country, these figures appear to have come out of nowhere. And in a way they did. Seattle is kind of nowhere, in the sense that Atlanta or Miami are certainly somewhere. But Seattle’s nowhereness has never been sleepy but very busy, and very creative. It is a place with a deep and complicated racial, class, and musical history. It’s also very green here. Now, no panel could fully capture the richness of this region and all of its oddities in the time available, but we (Mudede, Abe, Mizell) certainly hope to provide an introduction to what makes 206 hip-hop 206 hip-hop. This panel welcomes you to the gates of the Emerald City.

Daudi Abe, “The Roots of Seattle’s Progressive Hip-Hop”
Larry Mizell Jr., “The Sounds of the Frontier”
Charles Mudede, “What Is Green Gothic Hip-Hop?”


Moderators
avatar for Charles Mudede

Charles Mudede

Charles Mudede is a music, film, and cultural critic for The Stranger.  He has also contributed to a number of national and international publications. “Fontella Bass and the Philosophy of Soul” | In 2002, the British nu-jazz collective the Cinematic Orchestra opened its second album Every Day with a wonderful experiment in soul called “All That You Give.” It featured the mostly forgotten but very talented Fontella... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Daudi Abe

Daudi Abe

Daudi Abe is a professor at Seattle College and the author of the forthcoming book Emerald Street: A History of Hip-Hop in Seattle. “The Roots of Seattle’s Progressive Hip-Hop” | The voice of Black history in Seattle played a crucial role in the ultimate development of 206 hip-hop. The progressive vibe of the scene has reflected the progressive nature of the region, which included Black men and women voting in the 1880s and a... Read More →
LM

Larry Mizell Jr.

Larry Mizell Jr. is an LA-born, Seattle-based rapper who has written a weekly column about hip-hop and such for The Stranger since 2004 and DJ'd a weekly radio show on KEXP since 2009. “The Sounds of the Frontier” | Shaped by isolation and identity issues, the last frontier of rap in the US has long struggled to recognize itself and its voice. A strange brew of styles from NYC, the Bay, and the LA underground has... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Learning Labs

2:00pm

(En)Gendering and (Em)Bodying Black Voices Differently
Elliott H. Powell, “The Ghosted Voice of Hip-Hop: Sampling, Copyright, and the Queer Temporalities of Black Vocal Technologies”
Alisha Lola Jones, “The Heavenlies, I’ll Take You There: Black Countertenors and Transcendence in Gendered Gospel Performance”
Maureen Mahon, “Not Like a Girl: Tina Turner’s Vocal Sound and Rock and Roll Success”

Moderators
CZ

Christina Zanfagna

Christina Zanfagna is Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Santa Clara University in music and ethnic studies. She received her PhD in ethnomusicology from UCLA. Her research focuses on music’s relationship to religion, race, and geography in urban America, with an emphasis on Black sacred and popular musics. Christina has worked for non-profit organizations such as Afropop Worldwide, Mosaic Multicultural Foundation, and the Prison... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alisha Lola Jones

Alisha Lola Jones

Alisha Lola Jones is an assistant professor at Indiana University. She is completing a manuscript entitled Peculiar People: Meaning, Masculinity, and Competence in Gendered Gospel Performance, which breaks ground by analyzing the role of gospel music-making in constructing and renegotiating gender identity among Black men. Last year, Jones received academic acclaim and support through six research fellowships that included the Mellon Dissertation... Read More →
avatar for Maureen Mahon

Maureen Mahon

Maureen Mahon is an associate professor in the Department of Music at New York University. She is the author of Right to Rock: The Black Rock Coalition and the Cultural Politics of Race (Duke University Press, 2004) and is at work on a new book, Beyond Brown Sugar: Voices of African American Women in Rock and Roll, 1953-1984, under contract with Duke University Press. | | “Not Like a Girl: Tina Turner’s Vocal Sound and Rock and... Read More →
EH

Elliott H. Powell

Elliott H. Powell is an Assistant Professor in the Department of American Studies at the University of Minnesota. He is currently at work on a book manuscript entitled Music Between the Margins: African American and South Asian Collaborative Sounds in Black Popular Music. The project brings together critical race, feminist, and queer theories to consider the political implications of African American and South Asian collaborative music-making... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Demo Lab EMP Museum, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:00pm

Fandom and the Internet
Brodie Lancaster “Always In Our Hearts: On Queer Fandom and Collective Ownership”
Maria Sherman “Truly, Madly, Deeply: Exploring the Relationship Between Fandom and Mental Health”
Brittany Spanos “She Loves You… Loving Him: On Fanfiction, Fanart and Homoeroticism”

Moderators
avatar for Maura Johnston

Maura Johnston

Maura Johnston is a writer and editor who teaches at Boston College and edits the culture periodical Maura Magazine. She has written for The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Time, Billboard, and Rolling Stone; her byline also appeared in a number of publications that have succumbed to 21st-century industry tumult. She lives in Boston. “When You're Talking to Yourself and Nobody's Home: The Odd Malleability of the Hard Rock Frontman&rdquo... Read More →

Speakers
BL

Brodie Lancaster

Brodie Lancaster is a critic and editor from Melbourne, Australia. She has contributed to publications including Pitchfork, Rolling Stone, Rookie, Vulture, Jezebel, and The Pitchfork Review. She edits Filmme Fatales, a zine that explores the intersection of cinema and feminism, and in 2015 delivered a TED Talk on cinematic likability at the Sydney Opera House. She DJs under the moniker Baby Bonus, which mostly just involves crossfading between... Read More →
MS

Maria Sherman

Maria Sherman is a music and culture writer living in New York City. She's a head writer at Fuse Television and contributes regularly to BuzzFeed, Billboard, Rolling Stone, The Village Voice, MTV, Men's Journal, SPIN, Vulture, and more. After spending many years trying to convince herself to appreciate indie rock, Sherman discovered boy bands and nothing has ever been the same. “Truly, Madly, Deeply: Exploring the Relationship Between... Read More →
BS

Brittany Spanos

Brittany Spanos is a staff writer at Rolling Stone who primarily writes about pop music and teen culture. Previously, she worked as The Village Voice's Club Editor, handling concert listings and writing weekly for the music blog. She’s written words for Vulture, Nylon, SPIN, Pitchfork, and Rookie Magazine. If you had told her in 2001 that she would get paid for her boy band thoughts, she would have believed you, to be... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:00pm

Hall & Oates Find Their Voices
Stephen Thomas Erlewine, “’70s Scenario: How Daryl Hall & John Oates Walked Along the Red Ledge to Discover Their X-Static Voice”
Thomas Inskeep, “What Does an Imperial Phase Sound Like? The Voice of Hall & Oates at Their ’80s Peak”
Alfred Soto, “Downtown Life: The Urban Voices of Daryl Hall”

Moderators
avatar for Chris Molanphy

Chris Molanphy

Chris Molanphy is a pop-chart analyst and critic who writes about the intersection of culture and commerce in popular music. His work has appeared in Slate, Pitchfork, NPR Music's The Record, Billboard, Rolling Stone, and CMJ. Chris is also a frequent guest on National Public Radio (Soundcheck, All Things Considered, Planet Money, On the Media) and on Slate’s podcasts The Gist and the Culture Gabfest. He created the chart-analysis column... Read More →

Speakers
ST

Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Stephen Thomas Erlewine is a Senior Editor of Pop Music at Rovi, whose database of music information is licensed throughout the internet and can be accessed at Allmusic.com. While at Rovi/Allmusic, he's written thousands of record reviews and biographies. He's also contributed to Rolling Stone, Pitchfork, Vulture, Wondering Sound and Maura magazine, and has written liner notes for Raven Records and Legacy. | | “‘70s Scenario: How... Read More →
avatar for Thomas Inskeep

Thomas Inskeep

Thomas Inskeep is a pop-chart obsessive and critic who writes daily for The Singles Jukebox. His reviews have been published in Seattle Weekly, Allmusic, SPIN, and Stylus Magazine, and he has also appeared in The Village Voice and Nashville Weekly. Hall & Oates’ “Out of Touch” topped the Billboard Hot 100 the week of his 14th birthday. “What Does an Imperial Phase Sound Like? The Voice of Hall & Oates at their... Read More →
avatar for Alfred Soto

Alfred Soto

Alfred Soto is a media advisor and instructor at Florida International University in Miami. His work has appeared in Slate, Billboard, SPIN, The Village Voice, and The Quietus. He is a contributing editor to The Singles Jukebox and served as features editor for Stylus Magazine. His writing on music, film, books, and politics can be read at humanizingthevacuum.wordpress.com. His karaoke version of Hall & Oates’ “Say It... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
JBL Theater

2:00pm

Roundtable: Who Speaks for Country Music?
While country articulates working-class concerns symbolically and concretely, those who analyze it tend to be academic and media professionals, members of the “narrating class.” This roundtable will examine the processes of translation and ventriloquism that arise when middle-class voices dominate the public conversation about country, exploring the mainstream and allied genres, such as Americana, that carry very different class connotations. We hope to interrogate how structural power determines which voices can be heard in country discourse and with what consequences.

Speakers
JF

Jon Freeman

Jon Freeman lives in Nashville, where he is a contributor to Rolling Stone Country and the Nashville Scene. He has spent the last 12 years covering country music, Americana and Nashville's music industry for a variety of outlets, including the local trade publication Music Row Magazine and Nash Country Weekly magazine, where he served as managing editor.
JH

Jewly Hight

Based in Nashville, TN, music critic and journalist Jewly Hight contributes to NPR/NPR Music, Billboard, Vulture, Rolling Stone Country, the Nashville Scene, and a number of other outlets. Her work has also appeared in Cosmopolitan, Wondering Sound, VICE, The Oxford American, No Depression, Relix, and elsewhere. She was the 2015 recipient of the Chet Flippo Award for Excellence in Country Music Journalism and has a Master of Theological Studies... Read More →
avatar for Nadine Hubbs

Nadine Hubbs

Nadine Hubbs is a musicologist and gender-sexuality theorist who frequently treats socioeconomic class. She is author of two books, The Queer Composition of America’s Sound and Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music, and of essays and reviews including a new essay on Dolly Parton and country homoerotics in “Jolene” and a forthcoming chapter on epic heterosexuality in Springsteen. She teaches Women’s... Read More →
DP

Diane Pecknold

Diane Pecknold is Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Louisville. She is author of The Selling Sound: The Rise of the Country Music Industry and editor of Hidden in the Mix: The African American Presence in Country Music. She also co-edited, with Kristine M. McCusker, A Boy Named Sue: Gender and Country Music and its forthcoming companion volume, Country Boys and Redneck Women: New Essays on Gender and... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Learning Labs

3:45pm

The Producer’s Voice/Sounding Identity
Regina N. Bradley, “I’ll Call Before I Come: Sounding Pleasure in the Hip-Hop South”
Oliver Wang, “Making Beats, Producing Meaning: Johnny J and Tupac Shakur” (paper by Loren Kajikawa)
Sean Peterson, “21st Century Funk: A Microtiming Analysis of the Beats of Jay Dilla”

Moderators
avatar for Oliver Wang

Oliver Wang

Oliver Wang is an associate professor of sociology at CSU Long Beach and the author of Legions of Boom: Filipino American Mobile DJ Crews of the San Francisco Bay Area. He has contributed to NPR's All Things Considered, KCET’s Artbound, KPCC’s Take Two, the New York Times Book Review, and Los Angeles Times. He also writes the audioblog Soul-sides.com. “The Producer’s Voice/Sounding Identity” | Since... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Regina N. Bradley

Regina N. Bradley

Regina N. Bradley is an assistant professor of African American literature at Armstrong State University in Savannah, GA. She is also a spring 2016 Nasir Jones Hip-Hop Fellow at Harvard University. Dr. Bradley is working on her first book, Chronicling Stankonia: Recognizing America’s Hip Hop South, a study of how hip-hop updates conversations about race and agency in the post-Civil Rights South. She can be reached at... Read More →
avatar for Sean Peterson

Sean Peterson

Sean Peterson is a PhD student in Musicology at The University of Oregon, and holds a master’s degree in Jazz Studies. His research focuses on instrumental performance in hip-hop, including the band The Roots, and hip-hop musical theatre. Mr. Peterson plays bass in contemporary jazz, historically-informed classical, bluegrass-meets-gypsy-jazz, R&B, and afro-funk styles. In June 2015 he released his first album, Let It Show... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 3:45pm - 5:15pm
JBL Theater

3:45pm

Vocal Coaching
Masi Asare, “Singing Unhealthy: Lauryn Hill and the Limits of Vocal Sound”
Cain Cressall and Laura Glitsos, “Interactive Vocal Coaching Presentation: Extreme Vocals as Marginal and Mainstream Phenomena”
Jake Johnson, “How to Build the Broadway Voice Without Really Trying”

Moderators
avatar for Ginger Dellenbaugh

Ginger Dellenbaugh

Ginger Dellenbaugh is a cultural critic, musician, and professor at The New School, where she teaches about music, politics, and the voice. A trained opera singer, she performed for over a decade in Europe and the U.S. In 2015, she released the album Pastorale. Dellenbaugh lives in Vienna, Austria, and New York. “Seeing Songs: Pop Music, Sign Language, and the Translation of Voice into Sung Silence” | In Star Trek: The Next... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Masi Asare

Masi Asare

Masi Asare is a songwriter, voice coach, and PhD candidate in Performance Studies at New York University. Her voice students perform on Broadway, in touring productions, and at downtown rock/pop venues. Her songwriting has received honors from ASCAP, the Dramatists Guild, and the Ziegfeld Club, and her secret agent musical Sympathy Jones is produced around the world. Asare has served on the editorial staff of TDR and as a grant writer for... Read More →
avatar for Cain Cressall

Cain Cressall

Cain Cressall has been an extreme vocalist for more than a decade with Australian thrash metal band Malignant Monster, based in Western Australia. Since 2009, Cain Cressall has also fronted international touring band The Amenta, an experimental metal group based in the Eastern States of Australia. Cressall has also collaborated on a variety of projects such as Ouroboros and Swedish melodic death metal Zornheym. Cressall is interested in exploring... Read More →
avatar for Laura Glitsos

Laura Glitsos

Laura Glitsos is completing a doctoral dissertation on the impacts of digital music on the emotional dimensions of music listening. She has lectured at Curtin University and Edith Cowan University in popular music studies and has previously lectured in communication studies, cultural studies, Internet studies, and journalism. In addition to academic writing, Glitsos has worked as a freelance music journalist for Xpress Magazine. Glitsos has... Read More →
avatar for Jake Johnson

Jake Johnson

Jake Johnson is a cultural historian of American musical experiences. His work has been published in This Land Press, TEMPO, Echo: A Music-Centered Journal, Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, and Journal of the Society for American Music. Jake is completing his PhD in musicology at UCLA, where he is writing a dissertation that explores the rich relationship between musical theater and Mormonism. “How to Build the Broadway Voice Without... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Demo Lab EMP Museum, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

3:45pm

Vocalizing Race and Region
Tyina Steptoe, “Mexi-Cajun Blues: Accordions and Multilingual Voices in the Western South”
David Gilbert, “The Myriad Voices of a Sideman: Marc Ribot’s Guitars and Aesthetic Identities”
Charles L. Hughes, “‘I Don’t Want No R-E-S-P-E-C-T’: The Disruptive Black Southernness of Brittany Howard”

Moderators
DR

Dwandalyn R. Reece

Dwandalyn R. Reece is Curator of Music and Performing Arts at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture and is curating the music exhibition, Musical Crossroads, which will open in September 2016. Reece has worked on such projects as the 2011 Folklife Festival program, Rhythm & Blues: Tell it Like It Is, and is a member of the SI pan-institutional group, Smithsonian Music. Before joining... Read More →

Speakers
DG

David Gilbert

David Gilbert teaches African American and U.S. history at Mars Hill University, just outside of Asheville, NC. He has recently published his first book, The Product of Our Souls: Ragtime, Race, and the Birth of the Manhattan Musical Marketplace, through UNC Press, and is currently researching the racialization of Appalachian music, dance, and culture. “The Myriad Voices of a Sideman: Marc Ribot’s Guitars and Aesthetic... Read More →
avatar for Charles L. Hughes

Charles L. Hughes

Charles L. Hughes is Director of the Memphis Center at Rhodes College. He is the author of Country Soul: Making Music and Making Race in the American South (University of North Carolina Press, 2015). He has spoken and published widely in race and popular music in the U.S. He is also a musician and songwriter. “‘I Don’t Want No R-E-S-P-E-C-T’: The Disruptive Black Southernness of Brittany Howard” | In October 2015... Read More →
avatar for Tyina Steptoe

Tyina Steptoe

Tyina Steptoe is an assistant professor in the Department of History at the University of Arizona. Her research examines race, gender, and culture in the 20th century U.S. She is the author of Houston Bound: Culture and Color in a Jim Crow City, which was published by the University of California Press in 2015. “Mexi-Cajun Blues: Accordions and Multilingual Voices in the Western South” | Mingo Saldivar sits comfortably in his tour... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

3:45pm

Roundtable: The Voices in Our Head

What happens when our fan voice conflicts with our critical voice? After last year’s “Poptimism” moment, we began pondering the extinction of “guilty pleasures” in an age when (it is argued) charts are the most reliable barometer of critical consensus. What we are left with, perhaps, are guilty displeasures. Questions followed. Has taste become irrelevant, or, rather, is it being contested by younger social-media-schooled critics who refuse to be intimidated by it? Are we snobs if we prefer the raw-throated classicism of Chris Stapleton over the hip-hop-influenced beer busts of Florida-Georgia Line? Should we question the experiments on To Pimp a Butterfly because they don’t tear up the club? This is what happens when the voices out there become the voices in our head. In this panel we confess to how a critically championed artist or song has left us cold and unconvinced, then ponder the shame.


Moderators
avatar for RJ Smith

RJ Smith

RJ Smith is author of The One: The Life & Music of James Brown (Gotham Books, 2012); and The Great Black Way: LA in the 1940s and the Lost African-American Renaissance (Public Affairs, 2006). He has written for SPIN, The New York Times Magazine, GQ, and Yeti. An editor at Cincinnati Magazine, he is currently writing a biography of photographer and filmmaker Robert Frank. “Roundtable: The Voices in Our Head” | Download the fear... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Charles Aaron

Charles Aaron

Charles Aaron is a cultural critic who lives with his wife, son, and bulldog in Durham, NC. The former longtime Music Editor of SPIN Magazine and Editorial Director of SPIN Media, he once smoked a spliff behind the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with the daughters of Joe Strummer and Mick Jones while they shit-talked Lily Allen, which is simultaneously the most Poptimistic and Anti-Poptimistic moment in the history of music criticism. He’s... Read More →
avatar for Sally Jacob

Sally Jacob

Sally Jacob is a lapsed academic (ABD, Cornell University), former music writer (SPIN, The Village Voice, CityPages Minneapolis, SF Weekly), intermittent musician, and perpetual fan. She lives in NJ, commutes to an NYC-based job in corporate communications, and as a consequence listens to music on headphones at least two hours a day on average. “Roundtable: The Voices in Our Head” | Download the fear. In a striking and perhaps... Read More →
SR

Sonnet Retman

Sonnet Retman is Associate Professor of American Ethnic Studies at the University of Washington. She is the author of Real Folks: Race and Genre in the Great Depression (Duke, 2011). She co-directs the UW Women Who Rock Oral History Archive. “Roundtable: The Voices in Our Head” | Download the fear. In a striking and perhaps notorious study from five years ago reported in the journal Neuroimage, an Emory University professor... Read More →
avatar for David Turner

David Turner

David Turner is a freelance writer based in New York City. He got his start writing on Tumblr and since graduating from that platform has been featured in the Fader, Paper Magazine, Pitchfork, and Rolling Stone. He's fought being thought of as a "rap writer," "writer on Black artists," and "music writer"—though he likes doing all three—and continues pitching about mindless social media apps until he's no longer bound by any... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Learning Labs

5:30pm

Singing Books
Lara Langer Cohen, “Solomon Northup’s Singing Book”
Robert Christgau, “The Great American Popular Singing Critic”
Eric Weisbard, “A Critical Guide to the Literature of American Popular Music—Keyword Voices”

Moderators
MM

Michaelangelo Matos

Michaelangelo Matos is the author of The Underground Is Massive: How Electronic Dance Music Conquered America. He is at work on a history of the music business in the mid-’80s. He lives in the Twin Cities. “Prisoner of Your Love: How Tina Turner Came Back” | “What can you say about TINA TURNER?” begins Regency Artists’ circa-1982 bio of the R&B star. The Capitol Records biography, dated February 1984, gave... Read More →

Speakers
RC

Robert Christgau

A rock critic since 1967, Robert Christgau runs his “Expert Witness” column weekly at Noisey.com. He is a visiting professor in NYU's Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music who has published five books based on his journalism as well as the Oprah-certified 2015 memoir Going Into the City. He keynoted the first EMP and has presented at every subsequent edition. “The Great American Popular Singing Critic” | My next-to-last... Read More →
avatar for Lara Langer Cohen

Lara Langer Cohen

Lara Langer Cohen is Assistant Professor of English at Swarthmore College. The author of The Fabrication of American Literature: Fraudulence and Antebellum Print Culture (2011) and co-editor of Early African American Print Culture (2012), she has also published essays on subjects including 19th century mourning poetry, amateur newspapers, and summer jams. She is currently working on a book project tentatively titled Before Subculture... Read More →
EW

Eric Weisbard

Eric Weisbard is Associate Professor of American Studies at the University of Alabama, author of Top 40 Democracy: The Rival Mainstreams of American Music, and organizer of the EMP Pop Conference since its inception in 2002.  | | “A Critical Guide to the Literature of American Popular Music—Keyword Voices”  | A Critical Guide to the Literature of American Popular Music, the book I’m starting to work on... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 5:30pm - 7:00pm
JBL Theater

5:30pm

Staging the Voice
Pier Dominguez, “Of Whistles, Coos, and Doo-Wop: The Racial Kitsch of Mariah Carey’s Vocal Theatrics”
Justin D Burton, “Safe Sex, Pay Checks, and Cracked Voices: Rae Sremmurd’s Disappearing Club”
Samantha Bennett, “The Tech-Processual ‘Staging’ of Siouxsie Sioux’s Voice Inside the Panoramic Peepshow”

Moderators
MK

Mark Katz

Mark Katz is Tyson Distinguished Professor of the Humanities and Director of the Institute for the Arts and Humanities at UNC-Chapel Hill. He is the author of Capturing Sound: How Technology has Changed Music and Groove Music: The Art and Culture of the Hip-Hop DJ. He is co-editor of Music, Sound, and Technology in America and former editor of the Journal of the Society for American... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Samantha Bennett

Samantha Bennett

Samantha Bennett is Senior Lecturer in Music at the Australian National University. She is published in Popular Music, Popular Music and Society, and The Oxford Handbook on Music & Virtuality. Her first book, Modern Records, Maverick Methods: Technology and Process in Contemporary Record Production is forthcoming from the University of Michigan Press’ Tracking Pop series. She is currently working on a 33 1/3 series book on Siouxsie... Read More →
JD

Justin D Burton

Justin D Burton is Assistant Professor of Music at Rider University. His research revolves around critical race and gender theory in hip-hop and pop, and his current book project is called Posthuman Pop. He is co-editor of the forthcoming Journal of Popular Music Studies 27:4 (Sounding Global Southernness) and Oxford Handbook of Hip-Hop Studies, and will be a regular contributor to Sounding Out! in 2016. His favorite rapper is Macklemore or... Read More →
PD

Pier Dominguez

Pier Dominguez is a doctoral candidate in American Studies at Brown University. His dissertation, “The Melodramatics of Queer Race,” examines media and performance modes dismissed as melodramatic, trashy, kitschy, schmaltzy, and inauthentic. Formerly a teen biographer of Christina Aguilera, he has since written about Whitney Houston’s queer afterlife for Racialicious and his academic work has appeared in Camera Obscura and is... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Demo Lab EMP Museum, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

5:30pm

Vox Populi
Tom Ewing, “Vox Popular: The Charts as Soapbox in a Digital Era”
Erin MacLeod, “Sound System Culture in Jamaica: Still the Voice of the People?”
Phil Oppenheim, “When Tires Go Pop: Listening to the Voice of Firestone”

Moderators
avatar for Jack Hamilton

Jack Hamilton

Jack Hamilton teaches in the departments of American Studies and Media Studies at the University of Virginia. He is also the pop critic for Slate, where he writes about music, sports, and other areas of culture. His first book, Just Around Midnight: Rock and Roll and the Racial Imagination, is forthcoming from Harvard University Press in fall of 2016. “After the Future: Future, the Voice, and the Life of Auto-Tune” | Critical... Read More →

Speakers
TE

Tom Ewing

Tom Ewing is a London-based writer and market researcher. A former columnist and reviewer for The Guardian and Pitchfork Media, his main music project is Popular, a blog discussing British number-one hits. He also founded the influential music message board I Love Music. He has spoken at around 30 research and marketing conferences about social media, behavioral economics, and occasionally even pop music. He blogs at freakytrigger.co.uk and is... Read More →
EM

Erin MacLeod

Erin MacLeod teaches Caribbean literature at Vanier College in Montreal, Canada. She has also lectured in the Institute of Caribbean Studies at the University of the West Indies, Mona Campus, Jamaica. She is the author of Visions of Zion: Ethiopians and Rastafari in the Search for the Promised Land (NYU Press, 2014) and has written about music and popular culture for the Guardian, Rolling Stone, Pitchfork, and Deadspin, among... Read More →
PO

Phil Oppenheim

Phil Oppenheim has worked in the entertainment industry for longer than he would care to admit. For 25 years he toiled in the trenches of cable television, culminating with his role as SVP of Programming for TNT and TBS. More recently, he has joined the growing army of cord-cutters and cord-shavers in exploring the newer world of digital entertainment platforms, currently serving as the Chief Curator for the Comic-Con Subscription-Video-on-Demand... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

5:30pm

Roundtable: Verve and Fold: The Voice in Key(words)
We’ve devised a roundtable of quick-fire keyword entries that take on some of the formidable sounds of our recent past and present, including the soaring fetes of Patti LaBelle and the technological extension of Wendy Carlos. With keywords including vibration, harmony, and synthesized, the presentations will proceed as a continuous conversation in hopes of presenting a dynamic stream of consciousness that can detail the convergences and divergences of the voice and its approximation in the symphonic worlds of the late 20th and 21st century.

Speakers
avatar for Roshanak Kheshti

Roshanak Kheshti

Roshanak Kheshti is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies at the UC San Diego and the author of Modernity’s Ear: Listening to Race and Gender in World Music (NYU Press, 2015). She is currently writing a book on Wendy Carlos and the Moog synthesizer for the Bloomsbury 33 1/3 series. “Roundtable: Verve and Fold: The Voice in Key(words)” | The voice is memorable and virulent in more ways than what it can record of the spoken word... Read More →
avatar for Deborah Paredez

Deborah Paredez

Deborah Paredez is a poet and Visiting Associate Professor of Writing and a core faculty member at the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race at Columbia University. She is the author of Selenidad: Selena, Latinos, and the Performance of Memory (Duke UP, 2009) and the poetry collection This Side of Skin (Wings Press, 2002). She is currently writing a book on divas. “Roundtable: Verve and Fold: The Voice in Key(words)” | The voice... Read More →
avatar for Shana L. Redmond

Shana L. Redmond

Shana L. Redmond is Associate Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California and, for 2015-2016, Visiting Associate Professor of African American Studies at UCLA. She is the author of Anthem: Social Movements and the Sound of Solidarity in the African Diaspora (NYU Press, 2014) and a co-editor and contributor to Critical Ethnic Studies: A Reader (Duke UP, 2016). Her current work includes a project pursuing... Read More →


Friday April 15, 2016 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Learning Labs
 
Saturday, April 16
 

9:00am

Audile Icons
Jonathan Bogart, “Blank Space: The Unrecoverable Voices of Florence Mills”
Tom Smucker, “Overtones and Undertows: The Functions and Failures of Vocal Harmony in the Music of Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys”
Evelyn McDonnell, “Ellen Willis: The Female Listen and the Male Voice”

Moderators
avatar for Eric Lott

Eric Lott

Eric Lott teaches American Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center. He has written and lectured widely on the politics of U.S. cultural history, and his work has appeared in a range of periodicals, from The Nation to American Quarterly. He is the author of Love and Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class (Oxford UP, 1993/2013), The Disappearing Liberal Intellectual (Basic Books, 2006), and the forthcoming Black Mirror: The Cultural... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Bogart

Jonathan Bogart

Jonathan Bogart is a listener and writer in Chicago whose writing on music has been published by The Atlantic and Da Capo Best Music Writing. He works for the Chicago Public Library for love and money, and researches the popular culture of the 20th century for love alone. He blogs about music, comics, literature, art, and culture at jonathanbogart.tumblr.com, and tweets about the weather at @jonathanbogart. “Blank Space: The... Read More →
EM

Evelyn McDonnell

Evelyn McDonnell has written or co-edited six books, from Rock She Wrote: Women Write about Rock, Pop and Rap to Queens of Noise: The Real Story of the Runaways. A longtime journalist, she has been a pop culture writer at The Miami Herald and a senior editor at The Village Voice. Her writing on music, poetry, theater, and culture has appeared in publications and anthologies including the Los Angeles Times, Ms., Rolling Stone, The New York... Read More →
avatar for Tom Smucker

Tom Smucker

Tom Smucker has been writing about pop music and politics since Woodstock, and been listening to the Beach Boys longer than that. He has presented at EMP on Karen Carpenter and Lawrence Welk; Pentecostal religion and Sarah Palin; Bobby Darin; hip-hop and union organizing; and Toby Keith and Brad Paisley. Lots of his stuff can be found at tomsmucker.org or smileysmile.org. He has seen Love and Mercy six times and is currently president of CWA... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Learning Labs

9:00am

Hearing Borderlands
Ginger Dellenbaugh, “Seeing Songs: Pop Music, Sign Language, and the Translation of Voice into Sung Silence”
Katherine Meizel, “The Song Is You: Singers in the Hearing/Deaf Borderlands”
Danielle Maggio, “Gospel Mime: Cultivating Voice of Praise Through Embodied Service”

Moderators
avatar for Greil Marcus

Greil Marcus

Greil Marcus is the author most recently of Three Songs, Three Singers, Three Nations, Real Life Rock: The Complete Top Ten Columns, 1986-2014, and The History of  rock ‘n’ Roll in Ten Songs. A sixth revised edition of his first book, Mystery Train, was published in 2015. This spring he is co-teaching a course on 1948 as a transformational year in the American imagination at Berkeley. “The Democracy of the Deep Soul... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ginger Dellenbaugh

Ginger Dellenbaugh

Ginger Dellenbaugh is a cultural critic, musician, and professor at The New School, where she teaches about music, politics, and the voice. A trained opera singer, she performed for over a decade in Europe and the U.S. In 2015, she released the album Pastorale. Dellenbaugh lives in Vienna, Austria, and New York. “Seeing Songs: Pop Music, Sign Language, and the Translation of Voice into Sung Silence” | In Star Trek: The Next... Read More →
avatar for Danielle Maggio

Danielle Maggio

Danielle Maggio is a second year PhD student in ethnomusicology and a Teaching Fellow at The University of Pittsburgh. Her research examines soul music as a lived cultural practice, an artistic genre, a marketable commodity, and an important historical site for the articulation of gender, race, and class in American popular culture. She has taught for the MGR Foundation; Pittsburgh Montessori Schools; Westminster Choir College; and Recreational... Read More →
KM

Katherine Meizel

Katherine Meizel is Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Bowling Green State University. She holds a PhD in ethnomusicology and a doctorate in vocal performance, and her research includes topics in voice and identity, popular music and media, and disability studies. Her book Idolized: Music, Media, and Identity in American Idol was published in 2011; she also wrote about Idol for Slate from 2007 to 2011. She is currently co-editing the... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Demo Lab EMP Museum, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

9:00am

Queered Voice
Robin James, “Started From the Bottoms Now We Hear: Queered Voice in the Era of Post-Feminist Pop”
Gustavus Stadler, “Queer People’s Songs”
Nina Mashurova, “I Sing the Body Rejected: Precarious Identities, Precarious Vocal Styles”

Moderators
avatar for Barry Shank

Barry Shank

Barry Shank is professor and chair of the Department of Comparative Studies at Ohio State University. He is the author of Dissonant Identities: The Rock ‘n’ Scene in Austin, Texas, The Political Force of Musical Beauty and other encounters with the structured feelings of life in America. He has served as President of the US branch of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music. “The Voice in... Read More →

Speakers
RJ

Robin James

Robin James is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Women’s and Gender Studies at UNC Charlotte. She is author of Resilience & Melancholy: Pop Music, Feminism, Neoliberalism (Zero, 2015) and her writing has appeared in The New Inquiry, Noisey, SoundingOut!, Cyborgology, and The Journal of Popular Music Studies. She’s writing a manuscript that argues neoliberal political economy, algorithmic culture, post-identity politics, and... Read More →
NM

Nina Mashurova

Nina Mashurova is a writer and editor, covering music, arts, and culture with a special attention to queerness, cyborgs, and politics. They are a contributing editor to Global Voices and Freemuse, covering global censorship in arts and music, and have previously worked as the associate editor at Impose Magazine. They are a co-director of programming at the Silent Barn and a co-founder of the Gender is Over (If You Want It) project... Read More →
avatar for Gustavus Stadler

Gustavus Stadler

Gustavus Stadler teaches English and American studies at Haverford College. He writes about race, sexuality, popular music, sound, audio technology, and literature in the 19th and 20th centuries. From 2010 to 2013, he co-edited The Journal of Popular Music Studies with Karen Tongson. He is currently writing a book titled Woody Guthrie and the Intimate Life of the Left. “Queer People’s Songs” | On December 31, 1945, Pete Seeger... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
JBL Theater

9:00am

Singer-Songwriters
Loren Glass, “I Am Woman: Second-Wave Feminism and the Album Era”
Christa Anne Bentley, “‘For Everyman’: Singer-Songwriters, Anti-Vietnam Protests, and the Sensitive Male”
Zach Schonfeld, “Transformer Man: Neil Young’s Trans and the Dawn of the Inhuman Vocal”

Moderators
avatar for Andy Zax

Andy Zax

Andy Zax is a Grammy-nominated music producer. His writing—under his own name and the pseudonym @Discographies—has appeared in Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, The Oxford American, and elsewhere. The Village Voice hailed him as its music critic of the year in 2010, and he received an ASCAP Deems Taylor Award in 2014. He lives in Los Angeles, where he is at work on a book about Beverly Hills... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Christa Anne Bentley

Christa Anne Bentley

Christa Anne Bentley is a PhD candidate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she is completing her dissertation through the Royster Society of Fellows. Christa researches the politics of popular music, and her dissertation looks at the ways the singer-songwriter movement in Los Angeles intersected with social movements during the 1970s. Her fieldwork in Los Angeles has led to collaborative work with the Grammy Museum and... Read More →
avatar for Loren Glass

Loren Glass

Loren Glass is Professor of English and the Center for the Book at the University of Iowa. His first book, Authors Inc.: Literary Celebrity in the Modern United States, was published by New York University Press in 2004. His history of Grove Press, Counterculture Colophon: Grove Press, the Evergreen Review, and the Incorporation of the Avant-Garde, was published by Stanford University Press as part of their Post*45 series in 2013... Read More →
avatar for Zach Schonfeld

Zach Schonfeld

Zach Schonfeld is a reporter for Newsweek Magazine and a contributor to The A.V. Club and Paste. Previously, he was an editor for PopMatters and an editorial fellow for The Atlantic Wire. He's a graduate of Wesleyan University, where he was editor of the campus blog Wesleying and a recipient of an Olin Fellowship to study historic preservation. His writing has also appeared online at Rolling Stone, The Nation, TIME, The Atlantic, The Rumpus... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

10:45am

Instrumental Voices
Kyle DeCoste, “From Object to Subject: New Orleans Brass Bands, Gender, and the Liberated Voice”
Banning Eyre, “Guitar Voices of Africa: A Quest for Originality”
Will Fulton, “‘Sounds Human Ears Have Never Heard’: Michael Jackson’s Vocal Composition and the Beatbox Collective”
Tamar Sella, “The Instrumental Jazz Voice: Politics and Theories of Vocal Technology”

Moderators
avatar for Christine Bacareza Balance

Christine Bacareza Balance

Christine Bacareza Balance is Associate Professor of Asian American Studies at UC Irvine. Her writings on former Philippine First Lady Imelda Marcos, Asian American YouTube artists, Bruno Mars, Glee’s karaoke aesthetics, and spree killer Andrew Cunanan have been published in Women and Performance: a feminist journal, Journal of Asian American Studies (JAAS), and Theatre Journal. Balance is one-eighth of the New York-based indie rock band... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kyle DeCoste

Kyle DeCoste

Kyle DeCoste is an ethnomusicologist from Canada who lives and works in New Orleans. He holds an MA in Musicology from Tulane University, where his research examined the New Orleans brass band scene through a Black feminist lens. He is a staff contributor for the Society for Ethnomusicology’s SEM Student News and is an active organizational member of the Music and Culture Coalition of New Orleans (MaCCNO). “From Object to Subject... Read More →
BE

Banning Eyre

Banning Eyre is an author, guitarist, radio producer, journalist, photographer, and producer for the Peabody Award-winning public radio series Afropop Worldwide. His work has taken him to over 15 African countries to research local music, especially guitar styles. He comments on world music for NPR’s All Things Considered. He has published four books, the most recent book being Lion Songs, Thomas Mapfumo and the Music that Made Zimbabwe... Read More →
avatar for Will Fulton

Will Fulton

Will Fulton is an Assistant Professor of Music at LaGuardia Community College. He has contributed articles to The Oxford Handbook of Music and Disability Studies, American Music Review, the Grove Dictionary of American Music, and is co-author of a forthcoming 33 1/3 volume on Camp Lo’s Uptown Saturday Night. Will is a record producer and former A&R Director for Profile Records. He is a PhD Candidate in Musicology at the City... Read More →
avatar for Tamar Sella

Tamar Sella

Tamar Sella is a PhD candidate in ethnomusicology at Harvard University. She holds a BA in music from UC Berkeley. Her research interests include transnational music scenes and global circulation in contemporary jazz; theories of the voice and vocality; notions of vocality and instrumentality in contemporary jazz; relationships between musical aesthetics and politics of gender and race in jazz. Tamar is also a singer, and is currently the... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 10:45am - 12:45pm
Learning Labs

10:45am

Rap Revoiced
Melissa A. Weber, “Rapper’s Delight? The Overlooked Voices of Rap Before ‘The Message’”
Joshua Alston, “Chopped, Screwed, and Regendered: Vocal Dynamics and Tempo in Houston Hip-Hop”
Lauren Jackson, “‘My Presence is a Present’: Kanye West, Nicki Minaj, and the Laughter of the Rapper”
Nicholas Forster, “‘You Know We Can Get Away, Because I’m Calling Your Name’: Young Thug, Melody, and the Contemporary Hip-Hop Soundscape”

Moderators
EJ

Emily J. Lordi

Emily J. Lordi is an assistant professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is the author of Black Resonance: Iconic Women Singers and African American Literature and a forthcoming 33 1/3 book on Donny Hathaway Live. “Erykah Badu’s Afropresentism” | In her recent remix of Drake’s “Hotline Bling,” Erykah Badu replaces Drake’s catchy lament, “you used to call me on my cell... Read More →

Speakers
JA

Joshua Alston

Joshua Alston is a staff writer and television critic for The A.V. Club. He lives in Atlanta.  “Chopped, Screwed, and Regendered: Vocal Dynamics and Tempo in Houston Hip-Hop” | Houston’s esoteric hip-hop scene, and its homegrown “chopped and screwed” subgenre, briefly attracted national attention due mostly to the drug culture that sprang up around “purple drank” and the recreational use of... Read More →
avatar for Nicholas Forster

Nicholas Forster

Nicholas Forster is a PhD candidate in African American Studies and Film and Media Studies at Yale University. Interested in the relationship between technology, race, sound, and history he has recently published pieces in Film Quarterly, The Journal of Popular Music Studies, and liquid blackness. “‘You Know We Can Get Away, Because I’m Calling Your Name’: Young Thug, Melody, and the Contemporary Hip-Hop Soundscape&rdquo... Read More →
LJ

Lauren Jackson

Lauren Jackson is a third year PhD student in the Department of English Language and Literature at the University of Chicago. Her writing has appeared in The Atlantic, The New Inquiry, and The Awl among other places. With interests in dialect, sound, and linguistic diffusion, her work tracks moments of misrecognition in the ongoing entextualization of Black vernacular in 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century American literature. “‘My... Read More →
avatar for Melissa A. Weber

Melissa A. Weber

Based in New Orleans, Melissa A. Weber is an MA candidate in musicology at Tulane University. A respected crate digger and authority on funk, soul, and disco, she’s been featured in Nelson George's Finding the Funk documentary, Wax Poetics magazine, and the book Dust and Grooves: Adventures in Record Collecting. As the award-winning DJ Soul Sister, she hosts "Soul Power,” the longest-running rare groove show in the U.S., on WWOZ... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 10:45am - 12:45pm
Demo Lab EMP Museum, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

10:45am

Sentimiento Vocal to Fan Voces
Lorena Alvarado, “Sonic Motherhood”
María Elena Cepeda and Alejandra Rosales, “An Indecent Proposal: Latino Masculinity and the Audience in Latina/o Music Video”
Lillian Gorman, “The Transcultural Flows of Bachata in Mexican Chicago: U.S. Latino/a Identity, Popular Music, and Latinidad”
Michelle Rivera, “Postracial Orientations of Latin Crossover: A Case Study of Pop Star ‘Nigga’/Flex”

Speakers
LA

Lorena Alvarado

Lorena Alvarado holds a PhD in Culture and Performance from UCLA. Currently, she is a Visiting Scholar at Rice University’s Center for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Her manuscript, Corporealities of Feeling: Sentimiento, Feminism, and Transnationalism, develops a feminist theoretical framework of sentimiento (feeling and emotion) as vocal technique, gesture, and technology wherein Latina/o popular musicians radicalize notions... Read More →
avatar for María Elena Cepeda

María Elena Cepeda

María Elena Cepeda is Associate Professor of Latina/o Studies at Williams College. Her research and teaching focus on the intersection of gender and ethno-racial identity in transnational Latina/o media and popular culture, media audiences, and personal aesthetics. Cepeda is the author of Musical ImagiNation: U.S.-Colombian Identity and the “Latin Music Boom” and co-editor of The Routledge Companion to Latina/o... Read More →
avatar for Lillian Gorman

Lillian Gorman

Lillian Gorman is an Assistant Professor and Director of Spanish for Heritage Learners at the University of Arizona. Her research agenda is committed to engaging Latino/a cultural studies with sociolinguistics, and her research interests focus on issues of language and identity within U.S. Latino/a communities and U.S. Latino/a popular culture in the southwest and Chicago.  “The Transcultural Flows of Bachata in Mexican Chicago... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Rivera

Michelle Rivera

Michelle Rivera, PhD is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Center for Institutional Diversity and the Department of American Culture at the University of Michigan. Her research spans latina/o studies, digital media, popular music, and fan studies. Rivera is interested ways Latinidad is represented in mainstream media and popular culture. “Postracial Orientations of Latin Crossover: A Case Study of Pop Star... Read More →
AR

Alejandra Rosales

Alejandra Rosales recently graduated from Williams College with a degree in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, American Studies, and a concentration in Latina/o Studies. As a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Research Fellow she undertook various research projects that centered on women of color, media, and feminist issues. Currently, she serves as the Development Associate at the California Women’s Law Center, a legal non-profit dedicated to... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 10:45am - 12:45pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

10:45am

Voicing Rock
John Covach, “Re-voicing Pop: Vanilla Fudge and the Psychedelic-Symphonic Cover Version”
Ann Powers, “Hard Rock, Sex Sounds, and the Groupie System: Life at the Riot House, 1973”
Maura Johnston, “When You're Talking to Yourself and Nobody's Home: The Odd Malleability of the Hard Rock Frontman”

Moderators
HG

Holly George-Warren

Holly George-Warren is the award-winning author of more than a dozen books, including biographies of Gene Autry and Alex Chilton. She is the co-editor of American Roots Music and Martin Scorsese Presents the Blues: An American Journey, among numerous collaborative volumes. Currently at work on a biography of Janis Joplin, she teaches at the State University of New York at New Paltz. She has presented at every EMP Pop Conference but... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for John Covach

John Covach

John Covach is Director of the University of Rochester Institute for Popular Music and Professor of Theory at the Eastman School. He has published dozens of articles and is the lead author of the college textbook What's That Sound? An Introduction to Rock Music. He has co-edited Understanding Rock, Sounding Out Pop, American Rock and the Classical Tradition, and Traditions, Institutions, and American Popular Music. His MOOCs on Coursera have... Read More →
avatar for Maura Johnston

Maura Johnston

Maura Johnston is a writer and editor who teaches at Boston College and edits the culture periodical Maura Magazine. She has written for The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Time, Billboard, and Rolling Stone; her byline also appeared in a number of publications that have succumbed to 21st-century industry tumult. She lives in Boston. “When You're Talking to Yourself and Nobody's Home: The Odd Malleability of the Hard Rock Frontman&rdquo... Read More →
avatar for Ann Powers

Ann Powers

Ann Powers is critic and correspondent for NPR Music. She is the author of several books, including the forthcoming history of American music's relationship with American love and sex. “Hard Rock, Sex Sounds, and the Groupie System: Life at the Riot House, 1973” | The Los Angeles-grounded hard rock scene of the early-to-mid 1970s is often remembered as a lawless milieu: a Wild West populated by satin-clad outlaws and erotic... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 10:45am - 12:45pm
JBL Theater

12:50pm

Silenced But Eternal Voices: A PopCon “In Memoriam”

Popular music loses towering figures every year. But just a few months in, 2016 feels like a deluge of grieving: From Maurice White to Paul Kantner, Natalie Cole to Lemmy Kilmister, David Bowie to Glenn Frey, this has already been a staggering year of loss. Here, the Pop Conference will pay tribute to the deceased in a concentrated fashion—and in our idiom, with critical and evocative words, images and sounds on the big Sky Church screen, and a spirit of celebration. Join us for a series of short papers and video clips considering the aforementioned music deities and a few more besides. Participants will share personal reflections and wrestle with these artists’ legacies and unique musical voices.


Moderators
avatar for Christine Bacareza Balance

Christine Bacareza Balance

Christine Bacareza Balance is Associate Professor of Asian American Studies at UC Irvine. Her writings on former Philippine First Lady Imelda Marcos, Asian American YouTube artists, Bruno Mars, Glee’s karaoke aesthetics, and spree killer Andrew Cunanan have been published in Women and Performance: a feminist journal, Journal of Asian American Studies (JAAS), and Theatre Journal. Balance is one-eighth of the New York-based indie rock band... Read More →
avatar for Chris Molanphy

Chris Molanphy

Chris Molanphy is a pop-chart analyst and critic who writes about the intersection of culture and commerce in popular music. His work has appeared in Slate, Pitchfork, NPR Music's The Record, Billboard, Rolling Stone, and CMJ. Chris is also a frequent guest on National Public Radio (Soundcheck, All Things Considered, Planet Money, On the Media) and on Slate’s podcasts The Gist and the Culture Gabfest. He created the chart-analysis column... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Regina N. Bradley

Regina N. Bradley

Regina N. Bradley is an assistant professor of African American literature at Armstrong State University in Savannah, GA. She is also a spring 2016 Nasir Jones Hip-Hop Fellow at Harvard University. Dr. Bradley is working on her first book, Chronicling Stankonia: Recognizing America’s Hip Hop South, a study of how hip-hop updates conversations about race and agency in the post-Civil Rights South. She can be reached at... Read More →
DA

Daphne A. Brooks

Daphne A. Brooks is the author of two books: Bodies in Dissent: Spectacular Performances of Race and Freedom, 1850-1910 (Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2006) and Jeff Buckley’s Grace (New York: Continuum, 2005). She is currently working on a new book entitled Subterranean Blues: Black Women Sound Modernity (Harvard University Press, forthcoming). Brooks has authored numerous articles on race, gender, performance, and... Read More →
avatar for Alison Fensterstock

Alison Fensterstock

Alison Fensterstock is a former music writer for the New Orleans’ Times-Picayune and program director for the Ponderosa Stomp Foundation. In 2011, she co-curated the companion symposium to Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ “She’s Got the Power” girl-group showcase, which featured interviews with the Exciters, the Angels, and Lesley Gore. “I’d Much Rather Be with The Girls: Girl-Group Pop and the... Read More →
JH

Jack Halberstam

Jack Halberstam loves falsettos in men, women, and everyone else. Kate Bush is just the latest in a long line of falsetto-voiced singers (Sylvester, Prince, Maxwell, Antony Hegarty, Justin Timberlake, Thom Yorke) that Jack has obsessed over in the past few decades. What this means, Freud only knows, but Jack is delighted to be able to legitimately indulge his continued love for the falsetto at EMP this year given the theme of “the... Read More →
BK

Brian Kehew

Brian Kehew maintains a varied diet of musical activities.  He is best-known as co-author of the book Recording The Beatles, a technical look at the legendary group's work. He is also a producer and engineer, working mainly with Warner Bros. on their reissue projects. He also writes on music history subjects, designs and consults on musical instruments, and does tech work for The Who and others.
avatar for Danielle Maggio

Danielle Maggio

Danielle Maggio is a second year PhD student in ethnomusicology and a Teaching Fellow at The University of Pittsburgh. Her research examines soul music as a lived cultural practice, an artistic genre, a marketable commodity, and an important historical site for the articulation of gender, race, and class in American popular culture. She has taught for the MGR Foundation; Pittsburgh Montessori Schools; Westminster Choir College; and Recreational... Read More →
SN

Sean Nelson

Sean Nelson is a Seattle writer, musician, and actor. He has recorded and performed with Harvey Danger, Robyn Hitchcock, Death Cab for Cutie, The Decemberists, Nada Surf, The Long Winters, and as a solo artist. He wrote the 33 1/3 book Joni Mitchell Court & Spark and has been published in the Talkhouse, Entertainment Weekly, Best Music Writing, and, fingers crossed, the next Pitchfork Review. He is the Arts and Music Editor of The... Read More →
DR

David Ritz

David Ritz’s most recent book is Willie Nelson’s memoir, It’s a Long Story. In June, 2016, Little Brown will publish his collaboration with Tavis Smiley, Before You Judge Me, a study of the last sixteen weeks in the life of Michael Jackson. Ritz has collaborated on memoirs with everyone from Ray Charles and Don Rickles to Etta James and Cornel West. He’s presently working on books with Jessi Colter and Lenny Kravitz... Read More →
avatar for Barry Shank

Barry Shank

Barry Shank is professor and chair of the Department of Comparative Studies at Ohio State University. He is the author of Dissonant Identities: The Rock ‘n’ Scene in Austin, Texas, The Political Force of Musical Beauty and other encounters with the structured feelings of life in America. He has served as President of the US branch of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music. “The Voice in... Read More →
SW

Steve Waksman

Steve Waksman is Professor of Music and American Studies at Smith College. His publications include the books Instruments of Desire: The Electric Guitar and the Shaping of Musical Experience (Harvard University Press, 1999), and This Ain’t the Summer of Love: Conflict and Crossover in Heavy Metal and Punk (University of California Press, 2009). With Reebee Garofalo, he is the co-author of the rock history textbook, Rockin’ Out... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 12:50pm - 2:00pm
Sky Church

2:00pm

Decolonial Voicings
Chris Nickell, “‘Just Brown Enough’: Voices of Beirut’s Underground Music Scene”
Mark Katz, “Selling Out or Getting Paid? The Dilemma of Hip-Hop Diplomacy"

Moderators
AC

Ali Colleen Neff

Ali Colleen Neff is a media anthropologist who works collaboratively work with young people throughout the Global South. Her first book, Let the World Listen Right, documents the musical cultures of the Mississippi Delta. Her current book project, A Body in Sound: Women, Voice, and Media in Dakar, Senegal, is based on her Mellon/ACLS-funded fieldwork with women pop vocalists. She is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor... Read More →

Speakers
MK

Mark Katz

Mark Katz is Tyson Distinguished Professor of the Humanities and Director of the Institute for the Arts and Humanities at UNC-Chapel Hill. He is the author of Capturing Sound: How Technology has Changed Music and Groove Music: The Art and Culture of the Hip-Hop DJ. He is co-editor of Music, Sound, and Technology in America and former editor of the Journal of the Society for American... Read More →
avatar for Chris Nickell

Chris Nickell

Chris Nickell is a third-year PhD candidate in Music at New York University. He is currently working on two projects. The first, related to this paper, explores constructions of Arab masculinity in the transnational underground music scene centered on Beirut. The second takes up issues of gender, bodies, and voices in the early operatic genre of lament. Chris is also a shop steward, organizer, and activist with GSOC-UAW, the graduate worker union... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:00pm

Traces of the Voice
Charlie Bertsch, “Leaving Traces of the Voice: Realism in the Music Interview”
Dwandalyn R. Reece, “Music, Museums, and the Curatorial Voice”
David Ritz, “The Joys of Suppressing Your Own Voice”

Moderators
JE

Jasen Emmons

Jasen Emmons is the Director of Curatorial Affairs at EMP Museum, overseeing the Curatorial, Collections, Exhibits, and Education departments and championing Pop Conference every year. In his spare time, he occasionally gets to curate pop culture exhibits like Fantasy: Worlds of Myth and Magic and Taking Aim: Unforgettable Rock ‘n’ Roll Photographs Selected by Graham Nash. He started working at EMP in 1999, which makes this year his... Read More →

Speakers
CB

Charlie Bertsch

Charlie Bertsch is currently on the faculty of the Honors College at the University of Arizona. He is also co-editor-in-chief of Souciant, an eclectic magazine of culture and politics based in Europe. Back in the early 1990s, he helped found Bad Subjects: Political Education for Everyday Life, one of the longest-running online publications in the world, and has also written regularly for ZEEK, Tikkun, Phoenix New Times, and Punk... Read More →
DR

Dwandalyn R. Reece

Dwandalyn R. Reece is Curator of Music and Performing Arts at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture and is curating the music exhibition, Musical Crossroads, which will open in September 2016. Reece has worked on such projects as the 2011 Folklife Festival program, Rhythm & Blues: Tell it Like It Is, and is a member of the SI pan-institutional group, Smithsonian Music. Before joining... Read More →
DR

David Ritz

David Ritz’s most recent book is Willie Nelson’s memoir, It’s a Long Story. In June, 2016, Little Brown will publish his collaboration with Tavis Smiley, Before You Judge Me, a study of the last sixteen weeks in the life of Michael Jackson. Ritz has collaborated on memoirs with everyone from Ray Charles and Don Rickles to Etta James and Cornel West. He’s presently working on books with Jessi Colter and Lenny Kravitz... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Demo Lab EMP Museum, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

2:00pm

Voices on Record
David Cantwell, “Living Room Loneliness and the Sounds of Suburban Silence (Or, I Dig Anita Kerr)”
Douglas Wolk, “Zero Tolerance for Instruments!”
Andy Zax, “‘Son, There’s A Little Bit More To Life Than Joining A Group Or Playing A Guitar’: The Death Of The 1960s Considered As A Helix Of Dreadful Spoken-Word Records”

Moderators
avatar for Glenn McDonald

Glenn McDonald

Glenn McDonald believes that music is the thing that humans do best, and lives in fear that the music he hasn’t heard yet is even more amazing than the music he has. At Spotify he channels this into genre taxonomizing, music discovery, personalization, gothic symphonic metal and fraud detection. He spoke about Every Noise at Once at EMP Pop Conference 2014, and about Satanic metal and the worst songs in the world in 2015. “Can an... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for David Cantwell

David Cantwell

David Cantwell lives in Kansas City, MO where he teaches college English, including the course “Literature of American Popular Music.” He is the author of Merle Haggard: The Running Kind, the co-author of Heartaches by the Number: Country Music’s 500 Greatest Singles, and a contributor to The New Yorker online. “Living Room Loneliness and the Sounds of Suburban Silence (Or, I Dig Anita Kerr)”  | The music of... Read More →
avatar for Douglas Wolk

Douglas Wolk

Douglas Wolk writes about pop music and comic books for Pitchfork, the New York Times, Billboard, and elsewhere. His most recent book is the graphic novel Judge Dredd: Mega-City Two, with artist Ulises Farinas.  “Zero Tolerance for Instruments!” | There is a tiny but persistent strain of a cappella punk rock: nothing could be more D.I.Y. than the sounds of the human body. I'll offer a brief history of voice-only punk... Read More →
avatar for Andy Zax

Andy Zax

Andy Zax is a Grammy-nominated music producer. His writing—under his own name and the pseudonym @Discographies—has appeared in Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, The Oxford American, and elsewhere. The Village Voice hailed him as its music critic of the year in 2010, and he received an ASCAP Deems Taylor Award in 2014. He lives in Los Angeles, where he is at work on a book about Beverly Hills... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
JBL Theater

2:00pm

Roundtable: Conjured Collaborations, Political Voice, and Hip-Hop History
Across imagined and curated collaborations between Fela Kuti and De La Soul, Marvin Gaye and Yasiin Bey, and B.B. King and UGK (amongst others), Amerigo Gazaway and partner Rickey Mindlin bring towering individual voices into conversation, offering a new hip-hop and soul historiography. Together, the voices create a new, single voice. This panel will consider the Soul Mates Project’s work for how we might marshal voice to offer up lessons for musicology, music history, and social justice. Gazaway and Mindlin will discuss the process of putting together The Soul Mates Project. Robinson will give a paper considering the broader implications of the endeavor as a whole.

Moderators
avatar for Zandria F. Robinson

Zandria F. Robinson

Zandria F. Robinson writes on Southern hip-hop, the urban South, and Black feminist themes in the work of Black women popular culture artists. Her book, This Ain’t Chicago: Race, Class, and Regional Identity in the Post-Soul South is an ethnographic and pop examination of the intersections of race, class, gender, and region in Black identity. Robinson teaches sociology at Rhodes College, blogs at New South Negress, and tweets sundries... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Amerigo Gazaway

Amerigo Gazaway

Amerigo Gazaway is a Nashville native and the creator of The Soul Mates Project’s series of mashup collaborations. As producer of Fela Soul, Bizarre Tribe, and Yasiin Gaye, he has led presentations at USC, TSU, and the Google Tech Talk: “Redefining the Remix with Amerigo Gazaway.” His music has been featured in The Good Man film and Apple’s “Jason’s Verse” iPad commercial, and his work has been profiled... Read More →
avatar for Rickey Mindlin

Rickey Mindlin

Rickey Mindlin is the co-founder of The Soul Mates Project, which traces the roots of hip-hop by imagining “collaborations that never were.” As executive producer of Amerigo Gazaway’s Yasiin Gaye, Fela Soul, and Bizarre Tribe albums, Mindlin serves as conceptual collaborator with Gazaway, and the duo’s work has charted on Billboard’s Top Selling singles chart. He studied audio production at The New School before... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Learning Labs

3:45pm

Placing Voices
Laura Snapes, “The Wheal Thing: Aphex Twin’s Alternative Cornish Language”
Rebecca Gates, “The Shape of Voices: Exploring the Potential of Defining a Community of Voice(s)”
Glenn McDonald, “Can an Algorithm Have an Authorial Voice? Recommendation Systems and Applied Moral Philosophy in Playlist Generation”

Moderators
avatar for Douglas Wolk

Douglas Wolk

Douglas Wolk writes about pop music and comic books for Pitchfork, the New York Times, Billboard, and elsewhere. His most recent book is the graphic novel Judge Dredd: Mega-City Two, with artist Ulises Farinas.  “Zero Tolerance for Instruments!” | There is a tiny but persistent strain of a cappella punk rock: nothing could be more D.I.Y. than the sounds of the human body. I'll offer a brief history of voice-only punk... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Gates

Rebecca Gates

Rebecca Gates is an Oregon-based musician, artist, curator, and activist. She has toured and released albums internationally as a solo artist and as leader of The Spinanes. Her programs and work relating to issues of sound and space, listening, and artist’s roles in their communities have been hosted by PS1, Mass MOCA, P.I.C.A., The Museum of Contemporary Craft, New York University, and galleries in the U.S. and Europe.  "The Shape of... Read More →
avatar for Glenn McDonald

Glenn McDonald

Glenn McDonald believes that music is the thing that humans do best, and lives in fear that the music he hasn’t heard yet is even more amazing than the music he has. At Spotify he channels this into genre taxonomizing, music discovery, personalization, gothic symphonic metal and fraud detection. He spoke about Every Noise at Once at EMP Pop Conference 2014, and about Satanic metal and the worst songs in the world in 2015. “Can an... Read More →
avatar for Laura Snapes

Laura Snapes

Laura Snapes is a contributing editor at Pitchfork and former NME features editor who also writes for The Guardian, The Observer, The Financial Times, Uncut Magazine, Marie Claire US, and the NME among others. Born and raised in the remote county of Cornwall, she maintains a firm interest in regional musical identities and affirming the importance of a non-London-centric music press. Her work deals with feminist issues, language, technology... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Learning Labs

3:45pm

Singing Across the Color Line
Holly George-Warren, “Blues Singer or Appropriator?”
Keith Harris, “Accidental Post-Racism in a Southern Voice: What Country Music Did and Didn't Say as the Age of Obama Began”
Charlie McGovern, “Singing Across the Color Line: Passing, Crossing, and Voice in American Pop 1945-1955”

Moderators
avatar for Tyina Steptoe

Tyina Steptoe

Tyina Steptoe is an assistant professor in the Department of History at the University of Arizona. Her research examines race, gender, and culture in the 20th century U.S. She is the author of Houston Bound: Culture and Color in a Jim Crow City, which was published by the University of California Press in 2015. “Mexi-Cajun Blues: Accordions and Multilingual Voices in the Western South” | Mingo Saldivar sits comfortably in his tour... Read More →

Speakers
HG

Holly George-Warren

Holly George-Warren is the award-winning author of more than a dozen books, including biographies of Gene Autry and Alex Chilton. She is the co-editor of American Roots Music and Martin Scorsese Presents the Blues: An American Journey, among numerous collaborative volumes. Currently at work on a biography of Janis Joplin, she teaches at the State University of New York at New Paltz. She has presented at every EMP Pop Conference but... Read More →
avatar for Keith Harris

Keith Harris

Keith Harris is a music critic and immigration attorney who lives in Minneapolis. These days he mostly writes for Rolling Stone and City Pages. He also tweets as @useful_noise and blogs at usefulnoise.wordpress.com. “Accidental Post-Racism in a Southern Voice: What Country Music Did and Didn't Say as the Age of Obama Began” | In 2008, Barack Obama was elected president and Darius Rucker became the first African American singer to top... Read More →
CM

Charlie McGovern

Charlie McGovern directs the American Studies Program at William and Mary in Williamsburg, VA. He wrote Sold American Consumption and Citizenship in American Life, 1890-1945 (North Carolina), and he co-founded the Duke University Press series Refiguring American Music. He’s at work on a book titled, Body and Soul: Race, Civics and Belonging in Popular Music, 1930-1970, as well as a project on Nat Cole. “Singing Across the Color Line... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Demo Lab EMP Museum, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

3:45pm

Timbres
Kate Heidemann, “Nasal, Twangy, Pharyngeal, or Resonant?: Vocal Timbre and Vocal Tract Shape”
Mark C. Samples, “Privileging the Vocal Instrument: Instrumental Timbre and Legal Likeness”
Maria Sonevytsky, “The Rural Voice on Reality TV: The Politics of Timbre in the Ukrainian ‘Voice’”

Moderators
avatar for John Rockwell

John Rockwell

John Rockwell is an arts critic. At The New York Times he worked as classical music critic, reporter and editor; chief rock critic; European cultural correspondent; editor of the Sunday Arts & Leisure section; arts columnist; and chief dance critic. He also directed the Lincoln Center Festival for its first four years. A prolific freelancer, he has published books on 20th century American composition in all genres, Frank Sinatra and Lars... Read More →

Speakers
KH

Kate Heidemann

Kate Heidemann is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Music at Colby College in Waterville, Maine. She researches vocal timbre in popular music, and the relationship between musical sound and social categories like gender, race, and class. Her work includes studies of music by Billie Holiday, Aretha Franklin, Gladys Knight, Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton, and Björk, and she has publications forthcoming in Music Theory Online and Country Boys and... Read More →
MC

Mark C. Samples

Mark C. Samples is Assistant Professor of Music and Coordinator of Music History at Central Washington University. He currently researches the role of commercialism in music, with an emphasis on the branding of music and musicians after 1800, from Jenny Lind to Joan Baez, Tom Waits, and Sufjan Stevens. His essay, “Timbre and Legal Likeness: The Case of Tom Waits,” is forthcoming in the book The Relentless Pursuit of Tone: Timbre and... Read More →
avatar for Maria Sonevytsky

Maria Sonevytsky

Maria Sonevytsky is Assistant Professor of Music at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. She has published on the racialized accordion in the U.S., post-nuclear folklore in Ukraine, and on doing ethnography in post-Soviet rural Ukraine. She is presently at work on a book tentatively titled, Wild Music: Sound, Sovereignty, and the Ukrainian State. She is also a singer and instrumentalist who has played experimental chamber music, cabaret... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

3:45pm

Roundtable: Queer DisEmbodiments: Voice, Sexuality, Synchronization
How bodies resound queerly, how queer voices leave bodies behind altogether by inhabiting other bodies and creating dazzling asymmetries between source, sound, and sex(uality)—from the ethereal as well as irritating murmurs of Kate Bush’s The Ninth Wave (Halberstam), to Sia’s ventriloquial automatons, including her dancing child avatar, Maggie Ziegler (Kessler); to the dispassionate, polyamorous disco rapture of Grace Jones’ voice (McMillan); to the breathy, helium seductions of nerdy, androgynous crooners like Green Gartside of Scritti Politti and Michelle Chamuel from NBC’s The Voice (Tongson); to the British dance band Years and Years’ uncanny channeling of Black women’s voices (Nyong’o), we’ll move in and out of bodies in an effort to understand the technologies of queer vocalization.

Moderators
avatar for Karen Tongson

Karen Tongson

Karen Tongson is Associate Professor of English and Gender Studies at the University of Southern California, and the author of Relocations: Queer Suburban Imaginaries (NYU Press, 2011). Her work has appeared in Public Culture, Social Text, American Quarterly, GLQ, and Novel: A Forum on Fiction, as well as in The Believer, Public Books, Sounding Out!, You Offend Me You Offend My Family, Bully Bloggers, and Velvet... Read More →

Speakers
JH

Jack Halberstam

Jack Halberstam loves falsettos in men, women, and everyone else. Kate Bush is just the latest in a long line of falsetto-voiced singers (Sylvester, Prince, Maxwell, Antony Hegarty, Justin Timberlake, Thom Yorke) that Jack has obsessed over in the past few decades. What this means, Freud only knows, but Jack is delighted to be able to legitimately indulge his continued love for the falsetto at EMP this year given the theme of “the... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Kessler

Sarah Kessler

Sarah Kessler is a PhD candidate in comparative literature at the UC Irvine, where she is completing a dissertation on ventriloquism in contemporary popular culture. Her writing on art, film, and media has appeared in the Brooklyn Rail, In These Times, the Journal of Popular Music Studies, Public Books, and Sounding Out!, among other publications. Her article “Puppet Love,” on the documentary film work of the English... Read More →
avatar for Uri McMillan

Uri McMillan

Uri McMillan is Assistant Professor of English, African American Studies, and Gender Studies at UCLA. He is the author of Embodied Avatars; Genealogies of Black Feminist Art and Performance (NYU, 2015), the first full length study of Black women's performance art. He has published articles in Souls, Women and Performance, and GLQ as well as several essays for exhibition publications for the Studio Museum in Harlem. Twitter... Read More →
TN

Tavia Nyong’o

Tavia Nyong’o is Associate Professor in the Department of Performance Studies at New York University. He writes on art, music, politics, culture, and theory. His first book, The Amalgamation Waltz: Race, Performance, and the Ruses of Memory (Minnesota, 2009), won the Errol Hill Award for best book in African American theatre and performance studies. He is completing a study of fabulation in Black aesthetics and embarking on another on queer... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 3:45pm - 5:15pm
JBL Theater

5:30pm

Good Bad Singing and Bad Good Singing
Greil Marcus, “The Democracy of the Deep Soul Voice and the Republicanism of Its Melismatic Reversal”
Evie Nagy, “Too Real: Pop’s Complicated Relationship with Bad Singing”
Sean Nelson, “No Expression Whatever: Is Bad Singing a Moral Issue?”

Moderators
avatar for Kembrew McLeod

Kembrew McLeod

Kembrew McLeod is Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. He has published and produced several books and documentaries about music and popular culture, and his writing has appeared in The New York Times, Slate, and Rolling Stone. Kembrew’s book Freedom of Expression® received an American Library Association book award, his most recent documentary Copyright Criminals aired on PBS, and his new book on... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Greil Marcus

Greil Marcus

Greil Marcus is the author most recently of Three Songs, Three Singers, Three Nations, Real Life Rock: The Complete Top Ten Columns, 1986-2014, and The History of  rock ‘n’ Roll in Ten Songs. A sixth revised edition of his first book, Mystery Train, was published in 2015. This spring he is co-teaching a course on 1948 as a transformational year in the American imagination at Berkeley. “The Democracy of the Deep Soul... Read More →
EN

Evie Nagy

Evie Nagy is the author of the 33 1/3 book on Devo’s Freedom of Choice, and a former staff writer and editor at Fast Company, Rolling Stone, and Billboard. Her work was published in Best Music Writing 2010 and she co-wrote the afterword to Out of the Vinyl Deeps, an anthology of rock writing by the late Ellen Willis, the New Yorker's first pop music critic. She’s on the editorial team at Slack and lives in Oakland, CA. “Too... Read More →
SN

Sean Nelson

Sean Nelson is a Seattle writer, musician, and actor. He has recorded and performed with Harvey Danger, Robyn Hitchcock, Death Cab for Cutie, The Decemberists, Nada Surf, The Long Winters, and as a solo artist. He wrote the 33 1/3 book Joni Mitchell Court & Spark and has been published in the Talkhouse, Entertainment Weekly, Best Music Writing, and, fingers crossed, the next Pitchfork Review. He is the Arts and Music Editor of The... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 5:30pm - 7:00pm
JBL Theater

5:30pm

Racialized Voice
Maxwell Williams, “‘Black Lip(ped) Bastard(s)’: Hip, Sonic Blacknesses, and the Racialized Voice in ‘Neo-Bohemian’ Hip-Hop”
Brittnay Proctor, “‘Shout It Out:’ Patrice Rushen as Polyphonist and the Sounding of Black Women’s Racialized Gender Affectability”
Emily J. Lordi, “Erykah Badu’s Afropresentism”

Moderators
avatar for Shana L. Redmond

Shana L. Redmond

Shana L. Redmond is Associate Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California and, for 2015-2016, Visiting Associate Professor of African American Studies at UCLA. She is the author of Anthem: Social Movements and the Sound of Solidarity in the African Diaspora (NYU Press, 2014) and a co-editor and contributor to Critical Ethnic Studies: A Reader (Duke UP, 2016). Her current work includes a project pursuing... Read More →

Speakers
EJ

Emily J. Lordi

Emily J. Lordi is an assistant professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is the author of Black Resonance: Iconic Women Singers and African American Literature and a forthcoming 33 1/3 book on Donny Hathaway Live. “Erykah Badu’s Afropresentism” | In her recent remix of Drake’s “Hotline Bling,” Erykah Badu replaces Drake’s catchy lament, “you used to call me on my cell... Read More →
avatar for Brittnay Proctor

Brittnay Proctor

Brittnay Proctor is a doctoral candidate in the Department of African American Studies at Northwestern University. Her dissertation, “They Say I’m Different: Theories of Black Gender and the Grammatologies of Funk,” uses the work of Black funk musicians of the 1970s to consider how Black musicians theorized the ways that Black subjects precariously embody and perform their gender. “‘Shout It Out:’ Patrice... Read More →
avatar for Maxwell Williams

Maxwell Williams

Maxwell Williams is a PhD student in musicology at Cornell University. His research interests include hip-hop and 18th century music. He has given conference papers on topics ranging from punctuation form and “galant schemata” in Mozart’s minuets to gender construction and Amy Winehouse’s female subjectivity. His forthcoming chapter, “From Black Hipsters to Black Hippy: the Sound and Cultural Genealogy of... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Demo Lab EMP Museum, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

5:30pm

Southern Accents
Sophie Abramowitz, “Singing ‘Just Because:’ Elvis’ Chimeric Americana”
Grace Elizabeth Hale, “Reckoning: Michael Stipe and the Southern Sound of Early R.E.M.”
Joseph M. Thompson, “Black Speck: The Confounding Country Voice of O.B. McClinton”

Moderators
avatar for Charles L. Hughes

Charles L. Hughes

Charles L. Hughes is Director of the Memphis Center at Rhodes College. He is the author of Country Soul: Making Music and Making Race in the American South (University of North Carolina Press, 2015). He has spoken and published widely in race and popular music in the U.S. He is also a musician and songwriter. “‘I Don’t Want No R-E-S-P-E-C-T’: The Disruptive Black Southernness of Brittany Howard” | In October 2015... Read More →

Speakers
SA

Sophie Abramowitz

Sophie Abramowitz is a PhD candidate in the English department of the University of Virginia, focusing on American literature, critical race and gender studies, and popular music. Her dissertation examines the role of song collection in the Harlem Renaissance. She is also an archival assistant at the Alan Lomax Archive with experience as an oral historian and radio DJ, and, along with her colleague, is currently working on a forthcoming... Read More →
GE

Grace Elizabeth Hale

Grace Elizabeth Hale is the Commonwealth Chair of American Studies and Professor of History at the University of Virginia. She has written for many publications including the New York Times. Her books include Making Whiteness: The Culture of Segregation in the South (Vintage). Her current project is Cool Town: Athens, Georgia and the Promise of Alternative Culture in Reagan’s America. Before graduate school, she played in band and owned a... Read More →
avatar for Joseph M. Thompson

Joseph M. Thompson

Joseph M. Thompson is a doctoral candidate in the University of Virginia’s Corcoran Department of History, where he specializes in the culture and politics of the U.S. South. His dissertation analyzes the cultural impact of the South’s economic dependence on defense spending after World War II. Prior to attending graduate school, he worked as a musician and most recently scored the ITVS/PBS film Eating Alabama, which won the 2014... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Hyatt House 201 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

5:30pm

Roundtable: Archivista Praxis
Members of the University of Washington Library’s Women Who Rock: Making Scenes, Building Communities Oral History Archive Collective discuss archivista praxis. Habell-Pallán introduces the ethics of deliberately employing a networked archive as a tool for social change. De La Torre remixes artifacts to build an archive where none exists, showing how Chicanas in the 1970s Pacific Northwest altered public broadcasting to reach women farmworkers. Macklin focuses on digital media practices in building the Women Who Rock Oral History Archive. Viveros considers the decolonial possibilities of using archival material collected under colonial ethos for academic research by proposing what she calls theor-ethical-based scholarship.

Moderators
SR

Sonnet Retman

Sonnet Retman is Associate Professor of American Ethnic Studies at the University of Washington. She is the author of Real Folks: Race and Genre in the Great Depression (Duke, 2011). She co-directs the UW Women Who Rock Oral History Archive. “Roundtable: The Voices in Our Head” | Download the fear. In a striking and perhaps notorious study from five years ago reported in the journal Neuroimage, an Emory University professor... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Habell-Pallán

Michelle Habell-Pallán

Michelle Habell-Pallán is a professor of Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington. She co-directs the UW Women Who Rock Oral History Archive. She co-curated the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service's American Sabor: Latinos in U.S. Popular Music and jams with Seattle Fandango Project. Her article, "'Death to Racism and Punk Revisionism': Alice Bag's Vexing Voice and the Unspeakable... Read More →
AM

Angelica Macklin

Angelica Macklin (University of Washington, Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies). As an embedded filmmaker, Women Who Rock organizer, and PhD candidate, Macklin focuses on digital media and archivista methodologies in relation to building the Women Who Rock Oral History Archive and making media within music and social justice scenes. “Roundtable: Archivista Praxis” | This dialogue brings together members of the University of... Read More →
avatar for Monica De La Torre

Monica De La Torre

Monica De La Torre is a PhD student in Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington. As a Ford Foundation Fellow she is completing her dissertation, “Feminista Frequencies: Tuning-In to Chicana Radio Activism in the Pacific Northwest, 1975-1990.” She recently published, “Programas Sin Vergüenza (Shameless Programs): Mapping Chicanas in Community Radio in the 1970s” in the fall 2015 issue of WSQ... Read More →
IV

Iris Viveros

Iris Viveros is a PhD student in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies at UW. In addition to being a UW Area Studies and Indigenous Ways of Knowing Fellow, Viveros co-organized the 2015 AfroLatino Season for Movimiento Afro-Latino Seattle (MAS). A major source of her academic and personal inspiration comes from her participation as a bailadora/dancer and co-organizer of the Seattle Fandango Project, a community dedicated to... Read More →


Saturday April 16, 2016 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Learning Labs
 
Sunday, April 17
 

9:00am

Digital Prosumers Vocalize Identity
Jessica Pruett, “‘Reality Ruined My Life’: Lesbian One Direction Fandom and Disruptive Desires”
Douglas S. Ishii, “I Am Not a Hipster and Other White Lies: Seeing the Voice of Indie Rock”
Elaine Kathryn Andres, “Singable Sexuality: Booty Eating and Jhené Aiko’s Performance of Contingent Hypersexualities”

Moderators
CW

Christopher Woon

Christopher Woon is a documentary filmmaker, musician, and educator who currently lives in Seattle. He made his documentary feature directorial debut with the film Among B­Boys in 2011, a film that has shown nationally on the PBS World network. He has a passion for uncovering Asian American narratives, and currently works as a freelance filmmaker for the Seattle Channel and various clients while serving as the Seattle Asian American Film... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Elaine Kathryn Andres

Elaine Kathryn Andres

Elaine Kathryn Andres is a PhD student in Culture and Theory at UC Irvine. Her research interests broadly focus on narrative and performance as praxis with a particular interest in popular music and digital/visual culture. She holds a BA in Rhetoric from UC Berkeley. “Singable Sexuality: Booty Eating and Jhené Aiko’s Performance of Contingent Hypersexualities” | Omarion’s 2015 release “Post to Be&rdquo... Read More →
avatar for Douglas S. Ishii

Douglas S. Ishii

Douglas S. Ishii is the Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He received his PhD from the Department of American Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. His manuscript-in-progress, Dissembling Diversities: Asian Pacific American Arts Activism and the Racialization of Sophistication, examines Asian American activist media representations through their dual... Read More →
JP

Jessica Pruett

Jessica Pruett is a PhD student in Culture and Theory at the University of California, Irvine. Her research interests include transnational feminist theory, pop music fandom, identity formation, and queer composition. More specifically, her work examines lesbian fandom of boy bands with an interest in how this fandom complicates widely accepted narratives about and dismissals of the boy band and its fanbase. “‘Reality Ruined My... Read More →


Sunday April 17, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Demo Lab EMP Museum, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

9:00am

Locating the Voice in Exotica
Andrew Wenaus, “Breaking into the Anthropocene: Dislocating the Human Voice in Space Exotica”
Meenasarani Linde Murugan, “Chant of the Chosen Maidens: Gender and Exotica”
Manan Desai, “Listening to the Mau Mau: Colonial Voices and African Exotica”

Moderators
avatar for RJ Smith

RJ Smith

RJ Smith is author of The One: The Life & Music of James Brown (Gotham Books, 2012); and The Great Black Way: LA in the 1940s and the Lost African-American Renaissance (Public Affairs, 2006). He has written for SPIN, The New York Times Magazine, GQ, and Yeti. An editor at Cincinnati Magazine, he is currently writing a biography of photographer and filmmaker Robert Frank. “Roundtable: The Voices in Our Head” | Download the fear... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Manan Desai

Manan Desai

Manan Desai is an Assistant Professor in the Department of American Culture at the University of Michigan. His research has been published in Comparative Literature and the Journal of Popular Culture. He has been a member of the Board of Directors of the South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA), where he contributes original archival research, assists in building digital collections, and serves as an editor and contributor to Tides, the... Read More →
avatar for Meenasarani Linde Murugan

Meenasarani Linde Murugan

Meenasarani Linde Murugan received her PhD from Northwestern’s Screen Cultures program. Her dissertation, “Exotic Television: Technology, Empire, and Entertaining Globalism,” explores how U.S. Cold War variety television was central to visualizing and refashioning a global community of gendered racial diversity that was predicated on imperialism. She has been awarded fellowships from the Mellon Mays program, Woodrow Wilson... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Wenaus

Andrew Wenaus

Andrew Wenaus received his PhD in English at University of Western Ontario in 2013, where he currently teaches. His dissertation, “Metaphor and Metanoia: Linguistic Transfer and Cognitive Transformation in British and Irish Modernism,” examines the works of Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, and James Joyce through an analysis of linguistic metaphor and cognitive science. His most recent research on Les Baxter and “space... Read More →


Sunday April 17, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Learning Labs

9:00am

The Sentimental Voice
Andrew Berish, “The Sentimental Voice in a Hardboiled Era: Tin Pan Alley and Mainstream Pop During World War II”
Emily Gale, “Septimus Winner’s Sentimental Songs”
Carl Wilson, “Just Can’t Keep From Cryin’ Sometimes: The Catch in the Voice, Mimesis, and the Feels”

Moderators
SN

Sean Nelson

Sean Nelson is a Seattle writer, musician, and actor. He has recorded and performed with Harvey Danger, Robyn Hitchcock, Death Cab for Cutie, The Decemberists, Nada Surf, The Long Winters, and as a solo artist. He wrote the 33 1/3 book Joni Mitchell Court & Spark and has been published in the Talkhouse, Entertainment Weekly, Best Music Writing, and, fingers crossed, the next Pitchfork Review. He is the Arts and Music Editor of The... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Berish

Andrew Berish

Andrew Berish is an Associate Professor at the University of South Florida. His book, Lonesome Roads and Streets of Dreams: Place, Mobility, and Race in Jazz of the 1930s and ’40s (University of Chicago Press, 2012), examines how swing-era jazz represented geographic and demographic transformations of American life. He has published articles on Duke Ellington, 1930s “sweet” jazz, and guitarist Django Reinhardt. His... Read More →
avatar for Emily Gale

Emily Gale

Emily Gale is a Lecturer at UC Merced, where she teaches courses on popular music. Her work explores intersections between American popular song and sentimentalism, specifically in 19th century sentimental ballads; the National Barn Dance radio show; the 1960s TV show Sing Along with Mitch; and 1970s soft rock. She has performed with new music ensembles, her rock band, and as a solo pianist, and has curated arts events. “Septimus... Read More →
avatar for Carl Wilson

Carl Wilson

Carl Wilson is a freelance writer, the music critic for Slate, and the author of Let’s Talk About Love: Why Other People Have Such Bad Taste. In the winter of 2016, he will be the visiting Southam Lecturer in the Creative Writing program at the University of Victoria. He is a frequent presenter and former programming committee member of the Pop Conference. Most of the time he lives and cries in Toronto, Canada. “Just Can’t Keep... Read More →


Sunday April 17, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
JBL Theater

10:45am

Altered Strains of 1980s Downtown New York

Christine Bacareza Balance, "The Gangsters We Are All Looking For"
Ricardo Montez, "In Control of Being Out of Control: Grace Jones, Keith Haring and the Ends of Paradise"
Roy Pérez, "Abduction Near Hialeah and Other Startling Transports: Desire and Dissonance in the Martin Wong Papers"

 


Speakers
avatar for Christine Bacareza Balance

Christine Bacareza Balance

Christine Bacareza Balance is Associate Professor of Asian American Studies at UC Irvine. Her writings on former Philippine First Lady Imelda Marcos, Asian American YouTube artists, Bruno Mars, Glee’s karaoke aesthetics, and spree killer Andrew Cunanan have been published in Women and Performance: a feminist journal, Journal of Asian American Studies (JAAS), and Theatre Journal. Balance is one-eighth of the New York-based indie rock band... Read More →
RM

Ricardo Montez

Ricardo Montez is Assistant Professor of Performance Studies at the New School for Public Engagement where he recently developed and chaired the curricular programs in Race and Ethnicity and Gender and Sexuality. He is currently completing a monograph on the artist Keith Haring titled Keith Haring’s Line: Race and the Performance of Desire. "In Control of Being Out of Control: Grace Jones, Keith Haring and the Ends of Paradise" | This... Read More →
avatar for Roy Pérez

Roy Pérez

Roy Pérez is an assistant professor of English and American Ethnic Studies at Willamette University. His poems and essays appear in Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory, the Best of Panic! poetry anthology, Bully Bloggers, and FENCE Magazine. His current book project, Proximity: Queer Configurations of Race, examines representations of interracial closeness and collaboration in Latina/o literature, art and performance... Read More →


Sunday April 17, 2016 10:45am - 12:45pm
Demo Lab EMP Museum, 325 5th Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109

10:45am

Voice, Age, and Gender
Emily Baker, “Age in the Age of Autotune: The (Re)construction of Aretha Franklin”
Ian Biddle, “Voice, Listening, and the Slow History of Aging in Popular Music”
Richard Elliott, “A Blank Space Where You Write Your Name: Taylor Swift’s Early Late Voice”
Freya Jarman, “Voice, Affect, and Ideology at Christmas, or, What I Was Left Pondering When My Figgy Pudding Had Settled”

Moderators
SW

Steve Waksman

Steve Waksman is Professor of Music and American Studies at Smith College. His publications include the books Instruments of Desire: The Electric Guitar and the Shaping of Musical Experience (Harvard University Press, 1999), and This Ain’t the Summer of Love: Conflict and Crossover in Heavy Metal and Punk (University of California Press, 2009). With Reebee Garofalo, he is the co-author of the rock history textbook, Rockin’ Out... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Emily Baker

Emily Baker

Emily Baker is a second-year PhD student, working on the function, properties, and impact of the aesthetic of age in the voice in contemporary pop music. Conceiving of age in the voice as a site of resistance to normative assumptions of sex, gender and sexuality, her work is underpinned by phenomenological, feminist, and queer perspectives on identity; discourse on age/aging processes; and studies on the voice. In other words, she spends a lot of... Read More →
IB

Ian Biddle

Ian Biddle is a cultural theorist and musicologist, working on a range of topics in music and sound-related areas. His work ranges from the cultural history of music and masculinity, theorizing music's intervention in communities and subjectivities, sound, soundscapes and urban experience, and the politics of noise. He has interests in memory studies, sound studies, Italian workerist and autonomist theory, psychoanalysis, and theoretical... Read More →
RE

Richard Elliott

Richard Elliott is Lecturer in Popular Music at the University of Sussex. His current research focuses on the representations of time, age, and experience in popular music as well as the relationship between music and materiality. He is the author of the books Fado and the Place of Longing (Ashgate, 2010), Nina Simone (Equinox, 2013), and The Late Voice: Time, Age and Experience in Popular Music (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). | | “A Blank... Read More →
avatar for Freya Jarman

Freya Jarman

Freya Jarman is a Senior Lecturer in the music department at the University of Liverpool. She is especially interested in cultures and ideologies of the voice, and is the author of Queer Voices: Technologies, Vocalities, and the Musical Flaw (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), in which her three case studies are Diamanda Galás, Maria Callas, and Karen Carpenter. Her current projects are loosely connected by the theme of high notes in vocal... Read More →


Sunday April 17, 2016 10:45am - 12:45pm
Learning Labs

10:45am

Voicing the Uncontainable Feminine
Sarah Dougher, “Rock Authenticity and Tween Voices”
Ali Colleen Neff, “In Your Eyes, From Their Lives, Into Our Ears: On African Vocal Presence”
Barry Shank, “The Voice in Memoir”
Meghan Drury, “Voicing the Void: Natacha Atlas and the Transnational Feminist Imagination”

Moderators
TN

Tavia Nyong’o

Tavia Nyong’o is Associate Professor in the Department of Performance Studies at New York University. He writes on art, music, politics, culture, and theory. His first book, The Amalgamation Waltz: Race, Performance, and the Ruses of Memory (Minnesota, 2009), won the Errol Hill Award for best book in African American theatre and performance studies. He is completing a study of fabulation in Black aesthetics and embarking on another on queer... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Dougher

Sarah Dougher

Sarah Dougher is a writer, educator, and musician from Portland, Oregon. She is currently collaborating with Diane Pecknold on a book about American tween music criticism. She teaches American music cultures and gender studies at Portland State University and at high schools around the Portland area. Last year she had a Fulbright in Norway, and began work on her first volume of poetry.  “Roundtable: Voicing Girlhood in Popular... Read More →
avatar for Meghan Drury

Meghan Drury

Meghan Drury is a doctoral candidate in the Department of American Studies at the George Washington University. She received a master’s degree in ethnomusicology at UC Riverside, and is currently completing a dissertation entitled “Sonic Affinities: The Middle East in the American Popular Music Imaginary, 1950-2010.” She is managing editor of the Journal of Popular Music Studies. “Voicing the Void: Natacha Atlas... Read More →
AC

Ali Colleen Neff

Ali Colleen Neff is a media anthropologist who works collaboratively work with young people throughout the Global South. Her first book, Let the World Listen Right, documents the musical cultures of the Mississippi Delta. Her current book project, A Body in Sound: Women, Voice, and Media in Dakar, Senegal, is based on her Mellon/ACLS-funded fieldwork with women pop vocalists. She is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor... Read More →
avatar for Barry Shank

Barry Shank

Barry Shank is professor and chair of the Department of Comparative Studies at Ohio State University. He is the author of Dissonant Identities: The Rock ‘n’ Scene in Austin, Texas, The Political Force of Musical Beauty and other encounters with the structured feelings of life in America. He has served as President of the US branch of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music. “The Voice in... Read More →


Sunday April 17, 2016 10:45am - 12:45pm
JBL Theater
 

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